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Full text of "Abraham Lincoln before 1860"

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Abraham Lincoln 
before 1 860 



Crossing the Ohio River to 
Indiana, 1816 



Excerpts from newspapers and other 

sources 



From the files of the 
Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection 



yi?rr<n gh'OWSt 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Friends of The Lincoln Collection of Indiana, Inc. 



http://archive.org/details/abrahamlincxxxxxxxOOIinc 



Ohio River Crossing where the Lincoln Family Migrated to Indiana in 1816 




Between Cloverport, Hawkesville and Lewisport, Ky. 



The Lincoln family, comprising of Thomas _ 

Lincoln (Father), Nancy Hanks Lincoln (Mother), u.' 

Sarah (Sister) and Abraham Lincoln, left Knob o 

Creek Farm with their meager possessions ,J 

in December 1816 to settle in the Little Pigeon 2 

Creek section of Southern Indiana • — where J, 

Abe Lincoln's mother died in 1818. = 



PLACE 
STAMP 
HERE 



POST CARD 



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Bulletin of the Lincoln National Life Foundation ----- Dr. Louis A. Warren, Editor 
Published each week by The Lincoln National Life Insurance Company, Fort Wayne, Indiana 



Number 921 



FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 



December 2, 1946 



THE LINCOLNS' REMOVAL FROM KENTUCKY 



Some of the most important events in the life of 
Thomas Lincoln, father of the President, occurred in 
consecutive decades beginning with his birth in Virginia 
in 1776. Ten years later Thomas saw his own father 
shot down by the Indians in Kentucky which robbed him 
not only of guidance but financial support as well. In 
1796 we have the first record of Thomas as a laborer 
earning a daily wage, as on July 16 of that year at 
Elizabethtown, Kentucky, he was paid thirty-nine shil- 
lings by Samuel Haycraft. Ten years later he married 
Nancy Hanks on June 6, 1806. 

The significance of Thomas Lincoln's removal from 
Kentucky which featured his 1816 decade experiences 
has not as yet been fully appreciated. Inasmuch as the 
migration took place sometime between Thanksgiving 
and Christmas of that year this might be an appropriate 
time, on the 130 anniversary of the occasion, to further 
explore the far reaching importance of this move. 

The removal of the impressionable seven year old 
Abraham Lincoln from a slave state to a free state may 
have changed the whole course of American history. 
If Abraham had remained in Kentucky and had grown 
up with the institution of Slavery it is not likely he 
would have had any opportunity for political advance- 
ment in the party with which he became affiliated or the 
newly organized anti-slavery group which at a later date 
he helped to organize. 

What the change in atmosphere might have done 
for him had he remained in Kentucky is clearly set forth 
in his own words in a speech which he made at Peoria on 
October 16, 1864. He said in part: "I think I have no 
prejudice against the Southern People. They are just 
what we would be in their situation. If slavery did not 
exist among them they would not introduce it. If it did 
now exist among us we might not instantly give it up. 
This I believe of the great masses north and south." 

The little attention which has been given to the early 
reaction of Abraham Lincoln towards the slavery ques- 
tion has been due largely to the erroneous statements 
made by William Herndon about the attitude of Lincoln's 
parents towards involuntary servitude. On page 19 of 
volume one in the three volume edition of this work 
published in 1889 this paragraph appears: 

"The assertion made by some of Mr. Lincoln's bi- 
ographers, and so often repeated by sentimental writers, 
that his father left Kentucky to avoid the sight of or 
contact with slavery, lacks confirmation." 

This is but one of the many occasions when Lincoln's 
law partner would have come nearer the truth if he had 
referred to the writings of the President himself rather 
than depend upon gossip and his own imagination to 
draw the picture. 

He not only misrepresented the situation himself 
but even Beveridge, who placed so much confidence in 
Herndon's conclusions, was lead to comment "not the 
faintest evidence has been found indicating that slavery 
was so much as a contributory cause of their departure: 
indeed, it is doubtful whether that institution made any 
impression one way or another, on Thomas Lincoln's 
pallid mind." 

Both Herndon and Beveridge should have been fa- 
miliar with the autobiographical sketch which Lincoln 
prepared for Scripps in 1860 in which Lincoln made a 
direct statement about the reason for his father's mi- 



gration from Kentucky to Indiana. Lincoln wrote, "This 
removal was partly on account of slavery but chiefly on 
account of the difficulty in land titles in Kentucky." 

It would appear that the word of Abraham Lincoln 
about his father's removal would be a fairly good "con- 
firmation" of this very important fact that some "senti- 
mental" writers have had the temerity to mention. If 
Lincoln's own word did not constitute the "faintest 
evidence" about the removal, Beveridge could not have 
had a very high regard for Abraham Lincoln's integrity. 

In the debate with Douglas at Alton, Lincoln put the 
rhetorical question, "How many Democrats are there 
about here who have left slave states and come into the 
free state of Illinois to get rid of the institution of 
slavery?" The reporter claims that one voice interrupted 
and said "a thousand" another voice added "a thousand 
and one" to which Lincoln replied, "I reckon there are a 
thousand and one." 

Herndon also makes another comment with reference 
to Thomas Lincoln's reaction to slavery and the system 
in general in Kentucky, which reveals his ignorance of 
the whole situation. In the same paragraph which con- 
tains his former erroneous conclusion this statement ap- 
pears about Thomas Lincoln and his slavery surround- 
ings: 

"In all Hardin County — at that time a large area of 
territory — there were not over fifty slaves; and it is 
doubtful if he (Thomas Lincoln) saw enough of slavery 
to fill him with the righteous opposition to the institu- 
tion with which he has so frequently been credited." 

J. Winston Coleman, in his excellent work, Slavery 
Times in Kentucky notes that in 1820 there were 
126,732 slaves in the state. The Hardin County Com- 
missioner's Book for 1816, the very year of the Lincoln's 
removal, reveals there were 1,238 slaves within the 
boundary of Hardin county. That same year, according 
to the commissioner's book, one citizen in the county 
alone was in possession of fifty-three slaves — three more 
than Herndon claimed there were in the whole county. 

Lincoln had some correspondence with A. G. Hodges 
of Frankfort Kentucky in 1864 which should set at rest 
any controversy about the contributions of his parents 
to his earliest notions about slavery. Lincoln wrote, "I 
am naturally anti-slavery." If he was opposed to slavery 
by nature it would appear as if his parents had some- 
thing to do with the environment which created this 
natural opposition to the institution. Lincoln also stated 
in the Hodges letter: "If slavery is not wrong, nothing 
is wrong. I cannot remember when I did not so think 
and feel." 

We have Lincoln's own statement that his memory 
went back to his Kentucky days. Slavery was the most 
widely discussed question in the immediate community 
where he spent his early childhood as revealed in con- 
temporary records. His parents were members of an 
anti-slavery church and so was his school teacher, Caleb 
Hazel. The controversy became so heated in one church 
but a mile from Lincoln's birthplace that the doors of the 
church were closed. Would it be a reasonable supposition 
that Abraham's parents would prefer to bring up their 
children in a free state in preference to a slave state 
where the slavery subject was a continual source of con- 
troversy. The removal of the Lincoln's from Kentucky, 
as Abraham Lincoln has said, was "partly on account 
of slavery." 



This marker at Cloverport denotes the site where the 
Lincoln family crossed the Ohio River by raft on their 
journey to Indiana. , . -;• ,.- : •. J 



Marnarete C. Smith 
ClotCiporf Historian 
Cloverport, Ky. 40111 



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WHEN THOMAS LINCOLN MOVED FROM KENTUCKY TO INDIANA 



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1816 He was Ferried across the Ohio River al Cloverport Ky. on a Raft of Logs 
by Jacob Weatherholt. 

THE BRECKINRIDGE - PERRY 

COUNTY LINCOLN HIGHWAY 

ASSOCIATION. 

Edward Gregory, Secretary 

Cloverport, Ky. ptv^vJu-^ 
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SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 9. 1947 

If - r f Mlrsa^tTGr^nirF"' 

/ >:jCloverport Historian <■ 
^Cloverport, Ky. 40111^ 











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Ten pages of text and pictures, recreating 
scenes from Abe's youth on the actual sites- 




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Other invaluable help came from the "Filson 
Club; Louisville Free Public Library; Perr»Breck- 
inridge Historical Society and Spencer County 
(Indiana) Historical Society; Judge D. D. Dowell, 
Hardinsburg; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Smith, Miss Mil- 
JrecM3abbage, Mrs. Emma Dye, School Superin- 
tendent H. M. Wesley and L. J. Behen, all of Clover- 
port; Miss Lillian Pulliam, Patesville; Hilbert Ben- 
nett, Rockport; Mr. and Mrs. Kirby Peake, Knob 
Creek; Judge O. W. Mather, Hodgenville, and Mr. 
and Mrs. W. C. Tyler, Jr., owners of FarmLngton 
(page 16). 

To introduce the 10 pages, including this one, 
devoted to Lincoln in this issue Robert Wathen 
has painted a water color of the Lincoln statue 
near the west end of the Louisville Free Public 
Library. . 



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Officer* of Ladies Lincoln League confer with J. M. 
Cissell, Lincoln Memorial superintendent. Mrs. C 
N. McGill, in fnr coat; Mrs. D. W. Caddie, Mrs. C. 
K. Sights, Mrs. J. E. Robertson, Mrs. P. L. Kennedy. 

r' 

Who Made It Possible 

Without the enthusiasm and resourcefulness of 
Paul Hughes and Thomas V. Miller; Jr., an out-of- 
the-ordinary project like today's story on Lincoln 
could never have been completed. 

They spent a great deal of time during the past 
- two months on research alone. Then came travel, 
upward of 1,500 miles over Kentucky and Indiana. 
Besides finding the exact spots where events in 
Lincoln's life took place, they had to run down 
local people who suited the roles, and get together 
costumes and the other furnishings needed. 

It would have been hopeless except for public- 
spirited citizens in Hodgenville, Knob Creek, Har- 
dinsburg and Cloverport, Ky., Rockport, Ind., and 
a number of other places who were willing to be 
generous with their help. They made costumes for 
the pictures, even showed up on schedule in spite 
of illness. Superintendent J. M. Cissell gave per- 
mission to make the picture 
on page 17 (also that on 
page 9, at the start of the 
story) in the very cabin 
where Lincoln was born 
138 years ago next Wednes- 
day. The job of furnishing 
the empty cabin was taken 
over by Mrs. C. N. McGill, 
president, and other of- 
ficers of the Ladies Lin- 
coln League in Hodgenville. 
Mrs. McGill set up two 
Army cots for the bed, with 
improvised footposts; she 
furnished an antique quilt. 
Next biggest part of the project was arranging the 
oxcart scenes on pages 9 and 12. Harvey Smith's 
oxen were trucked from Patesville, Hancock 
County. (Two other pair were located, at Pineville 
and West Point.) Mrs. Boss V. Ehrmann loaned a 
two-wheeled cart from the Pioneer Village 
at Rockport. It had to be trucked in too, of course. 




Mrs. Bess V. Ehrmann 
loaned an old oxcart. 




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Marker at Clo\erport, Ky., is reminder of Lincoln 
family's trek to Indiana where young Abe grew up. 




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lis great President, whose birthday will be observed this week, is a product of life 
in Kentucky and Southern Indiana, and the region still teems with legends about him 

By PAUL HUGHES 

Photographed by THOMAS V. MILLER, 




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ANT) PEGGY SMITH OF CI-OV5RPORT ARE ABE AND SARAH: MRS. OTIS REED, HODGENVILLE. AND HARVEY SMITH. PATESVILLE. PORTRAY MR. AND MRS. LINCOLN. 

The Lincoln family reaches the Ohio River after the long overland trip from Knob Creek. They are going to Indiana. 



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Henry Enlow portrays Isom Enlow; Mrs. Otis Reed, Nancy Hanks 
Lincoln; Ray Moore, Baby Abe; Beverly Ann Howard. Sarah. 

A NEIGHBOR, Isom Enlow, stopped in the Lin- 
coln cabin (where this picture was made) in time 
to see newborn Abe, and to bring fire and water. 



BOY and man, Abraham Lincoln was a product ' 
of Kentucky and Southern Indiana. The long, 
long thoughts of his childhood and youth in 
frontier country set the pattern for the man who 
above all other Americans is the idol of freedom- 
loving peoples the world over. 

It was a bitterly cold reception that Abe got from - 
the elements when he- came into the world 143 years 
ago next Wednesday in the tiny cabin near Hodgen- , 
ville. It was almost a miracle that he lived at all. i 
It was bleak when, seven years later, he left with 
his family for Indiana. In between, life had been 
rugged indeed, but fruitful nonetheless. At 21, he 
ranged on into Illinois, his formative years behind 
him, those years that prepared his mettle, that made 
him great. 

The cold of the winter of 1808-09 came late, but 
it came suddenly, after an autumn of lazy sunshine 
followed by a November and December about as 
mild as those we ourselves so recently experienced. 
Hardy pioneers who hadn't made adequate prepara- 
tion were hopelessly caught in the grip of the blizzard 
that hit in January and continued into February. 
How Isom Enlow, well-to-do acquaintance of the 
Lincolns, sought refuge from the wintry blasts in 
a call at Tom Lincoln's cabin and to his surprise saw 
Abraham a few hours after he was bom (see Pages 
16 and 17) is but one of the stories that make up 
- the ever-increasing lore of Lincoln. 

So important are these tales — some of them fact, 
some likely fancy — in developing the character of 
the Emancipator that The Courier-Journal had seven 
of them re-enacted, using amateur actors drawn from 
the Lincoln country, in costumes of the periods. 

The story begins, of course, with the birth in the 
cabin now enshrined in a pink granite memorial on 
a slope on the farm, three miles from Hodgenville, 
not far from Cave (or Sinking) Spring. Whether 
this is actually the birthplace cabin, it seems impos- 
sible to say with certainty. When Lincoln's fame 
burst over the nation on his election as President, 
attention was directed to a cabin that was then 
standing on the farm, part of which is now the 
Abraham Lincoln National Memorial Park. It was 
purchased first by Dr. George Rodman, a Hodgenville 
physician, in 1861, and re-erected on his own farm 
a mile north of its original location. It was still 
there, although the ownership of the Rodman property 
had changed, in 1894, when A. W. Dennett bought 
it and moved it back to the original Lincoln farm, . 
110.5 acres of which he meanwhile had purchased. 
In 1897, the cabin was dismantled and placed on 
exhibition at the Tennessee Centennial at Nashville. 
John M. Cissell, now superintendent at the park and 
for three decades associated with its administration, 
said he helped in the dismantling, and that every 
log was marked to assure proper reassembly. Inside 
the cabin, these numerals can still be seen. From- 
Nashville, the cabin was sent to New York for exhibit 
in Central Park. In 1901, it was at the Pan-American 
Exposition in Buffalo. Then it was sent to College 
Point, Long Island, and kept in storage after its 
ownership changed. There it remained until 1906, 
when it was bought by the Lincoln Farm Association 
and re-erected in Louisville for the famed Kentucky 
Homecoming. It was then stored here until its tem- 
porary use at the laying of the cornerstone of the 
Lincoln Memorial. Returned again to Louisville for 
storage, it finally was brought back to the Lin 
Farm in 1911, when the memorial was completed, and 
was re-erected inside it. At that time deterioration 
made it necessary to replace 11 of the logs. 



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BOYHOOD days on the Knob Creek farm. Here is young Abe (portrayed by Howard 
Peake) looking at a chicken owned by Austin Goilaher (acted by Bernard "Knocker" 
Braden). This scene is set in front of the replica of the Goilaher cabin, supposed site of 
the Lincoln cabin. Young Peake is the grandson of Chester Howard, farm owner. 



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incoln was 



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1 INCOLN said in later years that the earliest 
j recollections he had were of life on Knob 
Creek, the 228-acre farm to which the 
family moved when Abe was about 2. 

Abe and Sarah, who had loved the old Cave 
Spring on the birthplace farm and had played 
about it and the old oak that Still is standing 
in sight of the memorial, were not wholly 
sorry to leave, because there would be 
neighbors nearer them, and children to play 
with. 

One of the first children Abe had ever seen, 
ether than Sarah, was Austin Goilaher, per- 
haps two or three years older. His parents 
lived about a quarter of a mile away from the 
Knob Creek home. The two families often vis- 
ited each other, and it was Austin who intro- 
duced Abe to many a pioneer wonder, such 
as the mill (Hodgen's Mill) from which the 
town of Hodgenville takes its name. 

But Abe was younger than Austin, and 
quite shy. The incident of their first meeting 
is told by one writer this way: 

"Howdy," said Austin. But Little Abe just 
stared at him. , 



"If you'll come , with me, I'll show you 
where Old Skinny killed a fox. That's my dog. 
The bones are there yet." Still Abe just stared 
at the strange, new boy. 

"And there's lots of places to go. The best 
is Hodgen's Mill. That's the place everybody 
takes their corn. It's made into meal there." | 

"How?" Abe was at last interested enough 
to speak, and Austin, telling the milling 
process, asked: "Want to go with rne to see it?" 

"When?" 

"Next time I go." 

"Yep." 

Then Austin pulled something cut of his 
pocket — it was a whistle fashioned from a 
stick of cane. 

"How'd you like to blow this? Til help you 
make one," said Austin. "But don't blow spit 
in it." Abe, who ,was playing with a pet 
chicken, dropped the fowl and \vent off with 
Austin into the woods, fast developing his 
new acquaintance. 

The two often made trips together to the 
mill, often roamed the wooded hills of the j 
near-by countryside, had many an escapade at j 
an overhanging rock along the 
more than once, fished in the stream. f >±o>^ 



creek and, j 











THE SAME BOYS as in the picture above re-enact the near-drowning scene, where Abe 
fell ix\to the creek. Abe is balancing himself on the log while Austin, seated, looks on. 

C tyrX 

One day, against parental orders on both 
sides, Austin and Abe tried a footlog over the 
narrow creek and Abe fell in. Austin was 
armed with a long pole he had cut, and fished 
Abe from the water. Soaked, Abe made for 
the bushes, stripped and hung his clothes on 
a limb to dry. 

"My papa will skin me alive," said Abe. "I 
bet yours will, too, if he catches up with us." 

It was a sad day for both the boys when 
the Lincolns left for Indiana, and very likely 
neither saw the other again. 






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JESSIE E. BEAVIN AS A n RAHAM LINCOLN: PECGY SMITH AS SARAH LINCOLN; HARVEY SMITH AS THOMAS LINCOLN; MRS. OTIS 

The Ln^oJii family approaches Cloverport, on the Ohio River, en route to its new home i 



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Lincoln and his sister 
were fed by a slave 
when in Hardinsbnrg 

'HEN a Lincoln Memorial Highway movement started 
in 1930, one of the facts dug up was the story of 
Lincoln's stopping in Hardinsburg for a time. It is be- 
lieved this was for two or three weeks, possibly while one 
of the party was ill. 

It seems that the late Matthias Miller, a Hardinsburg bank- 
er, reported that back in 1859, when Lincoln was nominated 
for the presidency, he and an elderly uncle, John DeHaven, 
were riding into Hardinsburg. The uncle told him that "the 
Lincolns spent two or three weeks in Hardinsburg, as Thomas 
Lincoln with young Abraham moved to Indiana." The cabin, 
in a hollow, was pointed out, the Miller affidavit said, adding: 
"My uncle further stated that he remembered particularly 
that when the party started from Hardinsburg, young Abe 
walked in the road in front of the wagon drawn by a yoke of 
oxen, and carried a long-stocked rifle on his shoulder. . . ." 

Another Gregory affidavit tells the story of how the Lin- 
coln children were fed by a slave woman in Hardinsburg. 
Gregory said that in 1920 Col. Logan Murray, then a New 
York banker on a visit to his native Cloverport, told him 
about it, quoting his father, the late Col. David R. Murray. 

"When the Lincoln family moved from Hodgenville, they 
came through Hardinsburg on their way to their land grant 
in Indiana. My father was living in Hardinsburg. Lincoln 
was driving two large oxen hitched to a cart or wagon, and 
a cow was tied to the hind end of the wagon. . . . The party 
consisted of Thomas Lincoln with his family, his wife, a 
daughter, and a small boy about 7 years old. . . . Old Minerva, 
a colored slave, who had been attracted to the scene and 
who had seen the condition of the children, went back into 
the house and came out with a plate heaped with slices of 
homemade bread covered with butter, a pitcher of milk and 
some cups. She seated the children on the steps of my father's 
house and fed-them." 

The story goes on that years later, Colonel Murray called 
Minerva into the dining room one day and said: 

"Minerva, do you remember the family that came through 
Hardinsburg, when we lived there (the Murrays had by then 
moved to Cloverport) and you gave them bread and milk?" 

"Yes, sir, Colonel, I remember it," said Minerva. 

"Do you remember the little boy's name?" 

"Yes, sir, Colonel, it was Abraham Linkhorn." 

"Well, Minerva, that little boy was the great Abraham 
Lincoln, and today he is being inaugurated President of the 
United States." 

"Lawd-a-mussy, sir, is that the truth?" 



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AUNT MINERVA, played by Mrs. Rena May Douglas, 
Hardinsburg, feeds the Lincoln children. Hessie Eugene I 
Beavin, Cloverport, is Abe, and Peggy Smith, Hardins- 
burg, is Sarah. The old Hamilton Hotel serves as scene. I 

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HIS BOYHOOD 

The boy asks a minister to preach a fune 



TIE Lincolns lived in Indiana for about 14 years, 
from 1816 to 1830, and in terms of Abe's years, 
from about 7 to 21. This was about a fourth of 
his whole span of life and beyond doubt the most im- 
portant in his physical, mental and moral develop- 
ment. 

Arriving in "Indianhy," the Lincolns — Thomas was 
40; Nancy, 32, and Sarah, 9 — picked their way slowly 
into the forest wilderness to the banks of Pigeon 
Creek, near where Lincoln City now stands, and 
built a rude three-faced cabin. The front was exposed 
except when covered by hides. 

The newcomers probably lived in that habitation 
most of the remainder of the winter, but certainly by i 
the following summer Thomas, with young Abe's 
help, built a second cabin, a four-sided cabin not j 
very different from that in which Abe was born at 
Hodgenville. Relatives and friends from ■ Kentucky j 
had preceded the Lincolns into Indiana — indeed that's 
one of the reasons why he decided to emigrate — and 
some came into the new country afterward, notably 
Thomas and Betsy Sparrow, Nancy Hanks' uncle and; 
aunt, who then were given the old three-faced cabin. 

Life on the Indiana frontier was about what it had; 
been in Kentucky, except that the land was less hilly, 
and somewhat more fertile. And that part of Indiana, 
was in the direct path of a westward movement,' 
from eastern seaboard states and Kentucky to the; 
prairies of Illinois. This movement gave frontiersmen, 
an added feel of adventure and zest — life was on the, 
march and they could see it with their own eyes. Abe, ; 



as he grew in years and in muscle, found mv 
— as a helper on the farm, store clerk, w 
ferryman's aid. y 

Lincoln's beloved mother, the slim, i 
trusting, God-fearing Nancy Hanks, died on 
5, 1818, at the Pigeon Creek cabin and was k 
a knoll in a coffin Thomas and his son Abe 
themselves made from the trees of the foi j 
source says the burial was without a fun 
that Abe, worrying about that fact, wrote 
letter — to Elder Elkins "back En Kentuck' 
him to come to Pigeon Creek and preach < 
funeral sermon. 




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To Indiana With The Lincoln Family. 



EMBER 16, 1958 



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Re-enactment of the Lincoln family's trek from Kentucky to Indiana 
calls attention to 150th anniversary of the 16th President's birth 

By JOE _ CHE AS ON , Courier- Journal Staff Writer 

r' A PREVIEW late last month was a reliable j f 1 
yardstick, then in the months ahead more and 
more attention will be focused on a man who 
was born in Kentucky, grew up in Indiana, spent 
his adult life in Illinois and died a martyr's death 
in Washington, D. C. | 

The man: Abraham Lincoln, the only Kentucky 
native ever elected President of the United States 
and in whose life and times interest seems to be : 
increasing steadily all the while. 

The preview: a re-enactment of the journey made ''---^ 
by the 16th President's family, in moving from Ken- 
tucky northward in the direction of his historical 
destiny in the late fall of 1816. 

The trek, which ended in Southern Indiana, was j 
made for two reasons. One was to call attention to 
the 150th anniversary of the birth of Lincoln next 
February 12; the other to point up the nearly year- 
long series of commemorative programs being 
planned by sesquicentennial commissions, working 
separately and together, in the states which were 
most prominent in his life. 

It was the Kentucky and Indiana commissions i 
which teamed to stage the 142-years-later migration: 
of Thomas Lincoln, father of the President, and 
his family from their home on Knob Creek in what 
then was Hardin County, Ky., to land he had 
claimed on Little Pigeon Creek in Spencer County,, 
Ind. ; 

The portion of the trek in Kentucky was set up 
by Dr. Rhea Taylor, executive secretary of the Ken- 
tucky Sesquicentennial Committee; his Indiana | 
counterpart, John E. Steege, had charge once the ! 
travelers crossed the Ohio River. 

The migration, which probably took 10 days or I 
more in 1816, was boiled down to three days in the 
re-enactment. As nearly as possible, the route taken ; 
by the real Lincolns — father, mother and two chil- 
dren — was followed. However, that was impossible 
except in some few localities, since the blacktop 
roads of today don't follow the crude trails of 1816. 
Moreover, not an awful lot of concrete evidence i 
exists as to the route over which, or even the exact 
day when, the Lincolns left Kentucky. After all, 
when they climbed into their ox-drawn jolt wagon 
for the long, hard trip north there was no reason, 
to suspect that the nearly 8-year-old boy who walked 
-alongside someday would become a man for' the j 
ages. 






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Marker at Cloverport, Ky., is reminder of Lincoln 
family's trek to Indianawhere joung Abe grew "P- 

The best evidence indicates that the Lincolns 
spent their first night on the road with relatives 
at Mill Creek, ajiny settlement which long since 
has been swallowed up inside the sprawling Fort 
Knox military reservation. From there they inched 
on through Elizabethtown, past Flaherty, Big Spring 
and Hardinsburg in a northwesterly direction and 
finally came to a ferry crossing somewhere on the 
Ohio River. 

Experts long have disagreed violently as to just 
where the ferry was located. But most seem to feel 
it was at or near Joeville, now Cloverport. To say 
the least, it is definite that a road—and there 
weren't too many in those days— led from Eliza- 
bethtown to Joeville, where a licensed ferry had 
been operating since 1802. 

Once' across the river .in Indiana, the family 
skirted the stream for some distance to pass through 
present-day Cannelton, Tell City and Troy before 
eventually settling on Little Pigeon Creek, two miles 
west of what is now Santa Claus, Ind. 

The trek made by the four persons impersonat- 
ing the Lincoln family followed that route generally. 
Still, for one reason or another, it was necessary to 
take a few liberties with history. 



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NANCY HANKS 
PARK 

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LINCOLN 
FERRY PARK 





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HODGENV1LLE 



Courier-Journal Map by B*n Raxnwjr 



Map shows generally the route both the Lincoln family and their modern impersonators took to Indiana. 



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jKNOB CHEEK, LINCOLN'S EOYllOOD HOME . . . 

j At Knob Creek, where the trek of 1816 actually began, the "Lincolns" pose beside a rail 
V \ \ ] fence before the replica of the cabin in which young Abraham spent part of his boyhood. 

For instance, in order to tie the journey and the 
upcoming birthday into the same promotional pack- 
age, the latter-day Lincolns started at the traditional 
birthplace cabin in the national historical park 
three miles south of Hodgenville. After that, they 
moved to Knob Creek, the point from which the 
original trek to Indiana actually started. 

Other places visited along the way included 
Elizabethtown, H.irdinsburg, Cloverport, Cannelton, 
Tell City, Lincoln Ferry Park and Nancy Hanks 
Lincoln State Park, , 



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HISTORIC TREK FROM HOUGEMVILLJE AJp . 

A modern version of Abraham Lincoln's family loads a jolt wagon for the re-enactment of the journey 142 
years ago of the Lincoln* from Kentucky to Indiana. Actors were Eben Henson as Thomas Lincoln, Mrs 
Mary Genevieve Edwards, Nancy Hanks Lincoln; William Rider, Jr., Abraham the boy, and Constance 
Lombs, Sarah Lincoln. Young Rider (right, above) got inspiration from Lincoln statue in Hod-en- | 
ville and the '"family" (right, below) visited Lincoln birthplace at Lincoln Historical National Park I 




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Beside a flax wheel once owned by Nancy Hanks Lincoln 
(now by Mrs. Bruce Moreman) her impersonator, center, 
talks with Mrs. Thomas Trent, Mrs. Hughes Goodman. 




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For the journey between cities, wagon, horses and cow 
were loaded on vehicles supplied by Fort Knox. Actors 
rested from wagon jolts by breezing along in cars. 



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Lincoln Celebration: At Hardinsb 



By Bernard H. Miller 
Welcome to Fort Hardin . . 
so read the banner stretched 
across highway 60 at the east end 
of Hardinsburg. History was 
rolled back 142 years to 1816 as 
the town went out in celebra- 
tion of the re-enactment of the 
passage of the Lincoln family 
through Hardinsburg. The streets 
were draped with flags, banners 
were flying, shops were closed 
and displays of antiques were in 
store windows. 

Back in. 1816 when the Lincoln 
family came through, the town, 
the wagon with their meager pos- 
sessions was pulled by two large 
oxen whose size attracted atten- 
tion to the travelers and caused 
residents to learn the name of 
the family. It is said that the 
boy, Abe, and his sister were fed 
cups of milk and bread by old 
Minerva, a slave. Later when 
Abe Lincoln became the 16th 
President of the United States,! 
some of the residents of Hardins- 
burg were able to recall the visit! 
of the Lincoln family as it jour- 
neyed on its way to Indiana. 

The celebration here last 
Thursday was a high light of the 
second day of a three-day re- 
staging of the 126-mile trail made 
by the family of Thomas Lincoln, 
Abe's father, in migrating from 
their home near Hodgenville, 
Kentucky to Indiana. The jour- 
ney was made to call attention to 
the 150th anniversary of the birth 
of Lincoln next February. 

The travelers were met at the 
entrance of the town by members 
of the woman's club dressed in 
flowing skirts and dresses that 
go back to Lincoln's time and by 
men and boys dressed in coon 
skin caps and the rough clothes 
of frontier days. 

A crowd estimated as high as 



The Lincoln Story 

Joe Creason and Chief Color Photographer 
II. Harold Davis spent all of three days fol- 
lowing (and preceding) the Lincoln caravan 
through Kentucky and Southern Indiana. It 
was arranged to focus attention on the ob- 
servance of the 150th anniversary of Lincoln's 
birth. Joe's story and Harold's color pictures 
run from Page 18 to Page 23. And on the 
cover we see grade school children waving 
on a Hodgenville street as the covered wagon 
made its way through town. 



2000 watched the parade headed 
j by the VFW color guard and 
| Army Peserve Unit and highlight- 
ed by the fast stepping Du Pont 
Manuel High School band, move 
to the Courthouse Square. Fol- 
lowing the band in the parade 
came the Lincoln family in their 
wagon drawn by two horses with 
the family cow tied to the back 
of the wagon. The part of young 
Abe Lincoln in the re-enactment 
was played by 11-year old Wil- 
liam Ryder, Indianapolis. Eben 1 
Henson, Danville, Ky. was his 1 
father, Thomas Lincoln while 
Mrs. Genevieve Edwards, Lex-' 
ington, Ky., was his mother, 
Nancy. Constance Combs, Ind- 
ianapolis, is his sister, Sarah. 

The group was welcomed by 
mayor Jesse T. Beard. Master of; 
ceremonies for the occasion was" 
the Rev. Robert Wayne. Two 
spirituals were sung by the Har-' 
dinsburg Training School and the 
Breckinridge County High School 
Glee Club entertained the large 
crowd with two selections. 

A review of Lincoln's boyhood 
was ' given by Bob Teaff with 
Murray Beard sketching Lincoln, 
the Man. Mrs. Jesse T. Beard 
sang an old Kentucky ballad. 

One of the highlights of the! 
celebration, was the impersona- 
tion of Lincoln giving the Gettys- 
burg Address by Melvin Duke. 
Dressed in the costume of the 
day including the famous stove-' 
pipe hat, he made a striking re- 
semblance to the famed Emanci- 
pator. 

After the progam, the wagon 
and horses were reloaded in the 
army van from the Fort Knox 
Armored Center and hauled to 
Cloverport. There a tea was held: 
in the Baptist Church followed by 
a dinner at the Methodist Church. 
On Friday morning in cere- 
monies at the river's edge, hun- 
dreds of residents of Cloverport 
watched as the crossing of the 
Ohio river by the Lincoln family 
was re-enacted to the strains of 
music from the Fort Knox Army 
Band. As the crowd stood on 
the river front overlooking the 
Ohio, their minds must have 
turned back to that wretchedly 
poor family struggling toward a 
new destiny and to the awkward 
looking boy, Abe, who grew to 
manhood and fulfilled a mission 
and whose name is revered a- 
round the world today as the 
champion of the little people. 



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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 4 , 19 5 8 




Group Moves 
Into Iinliana 
This Morning 

i By JOE CREASON 

Courier-Journal Staff Writer 

Hardinsburg, Ky., . Oct. 23. — 
Back in the late fall of 1816 a 
pathetic looking family of four, 
riding with all their possessions 
in a jolt wagon pulled by two 
large oxen, stopped in this then 
newly incorporated village. 
•- Reports passed down over the 
years by word of mouth told 
that a crowd, attracted by the 
size of the oxen, soon gathered 
and learned that the family— a 
man, his wife, and two children 
— was on its way to Indiana. 

The old wives' tales also hold 
that old Minerva, a slave, 
brought out bread and milk for 
the half-starved children. After 
stopping briefly here, the group 
moved on north to cross the 
Ohio River into Indiana at Joes- 
ville, now Cloverport. 

Is Second Day 

; Thursday, 132 years later, a 
crowd estimated at 1,500 per- 
sons gathered here to see the 
re-enactment of the passage of 
that family through Hardins- 
burg. Only Thursday's crowd 



didn't gather to stare at. the 
oxen. Rather, it gathered be- 
cause the son of that family 
turned out to have been a man 
of destiny— Abraham Lincoln, 
16th President of the United 
States. - . ... , 

The celebration here was a 
high light of the second day of 
a three-day restaging of the 
126-mile trek made by the fam- 
ily of Thomas Lincoln, Abe's 
father, in migrating from their 
home near Hodgenville, in Ken- 
tucky, to Indiana. 

The journey, which when it 
was made in 1816 took 10 days, 
is being made to call attention 
to the 150th anniversary of the 
birth of Lincoln next February. 

Hardinsburg put its best, foot 
forward in welcoming the latter- 
day Lincoln family, which, tak- 
ing some liberty with history, 
is traveling in a wagon drawn 
by two horses. 

Draped With Flags 

The streets were draped with 
flags and downtown store win- 
dows were decorated with an- 
tiques. More than 100 costumed 
women, some of them wearing 
dresses that go back to Lincoln's 
time, met the travelers at the 
city limits. 

The Louisville du Pont Man- 
ual High School band led a pa- 
rade to the Courthouse Square, 
where an hour-long program 



was held. After a band concert, 
the chorus from the' Hardins- 
burg Training School and the 
Breckinridge County High 
School glee club performed. 
Mayor Jesse T. Beard welcomed 
the visitors. Other speakers told 
the story of the Lincoln family's 
passing this way. 

After the program here, the 
wagon and horses were reloaded 
into vans from the Fort Knox 
Armored Center and hauled to 
Cloverport, the last stop of the 
day. There a tea was held in the 
Baptist Church, followed by a 
dinner at the Methodist Church. 

To Stop at Park 

Friday the Ohio River cross- 
ing of the Lincolns into Indiana 
will be re-enacted at 9 a.m. 
(C.S.T.). The Friday program 
will include stops at Nancy 
Hanks Lincoln State Park and 
Santa Claus. 

The part of young Abe Lin- 
coln in the re-enactment is be- 
ing played by 11-year-old Wil- 
liam Ryder, Indianapolis. Eben 
Henson, Danville, Ky., is his fa- 
ther, Thomas Lincoln, while Mrs. 
Mary Genevieve Edwards, Lex- 
ington, is his mother, Nancy. 
Constance Combs,, Indianapolis, 
"is his sister, Sarah. 
_ The trek is being sponsored 
jointly by the Kentucky and In- 
diana Lincoln sesquicentennial 
commissions. 




HARDINSBURG WHERE 1,500 CELEBRATED . . . 

Hardinsburg, which was a newly incorporated village when the Lincoln family passed through 
in 1816, turned out a big welcome for the modern travelers. Above, a large crowd watches 
as the wagon passes one of the city's oldest houses. Many Hardinsburg citizens wore early 
19th Century costumes, including attorney Melvin Duke, who attired himself for the occa- 
sion as Lincoln the man. At right, Lincoln the man and Lincoln the boy pose together. 




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YOUNG ABE LINCOLN, 11 -year-old William Hyder of Indian- 
apolis, admires the stovepipe hat worn by Old Abe (Melvin 
Duke) as his sister, Sarah (Constance Combs) looks on. 
—Photo by Thos, 'D. Trent. 




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October 24, 1958 




Mrs. Wathen Tobin, chairman 
of the Lincoln Trek Celebration 
has announced that the program 
for the Hardinsburg part of the 
celebration has been set up along 
these lines: The Lincoln family, 
with their livestock, will arrive 
at the east end of Hardinsburg 
and unload at one o'clock, Thurs- 
day at the Army Reserve Build- 
ing. There a parade will form, 
headed by the color guard from 
the V. F. W. Army Reserve, 
Manual Band, the covered wag- 
on and whatever they bring with 
them. The parade will pause for 
the benefit of the school chil- 
dren, where the band will play 
a number. 

..The procession will move on to 
the public square where the 
courthouse stood. The band will 
move into the square and play 
selections while the platform 
guests take their places. 

In the event of bad weather, 
the program will be held in the 
auditorium of Breckinridge 



County High School. " 

At two o'clock the program 
numbers including glee club se- 
lections and speechmaking will 
start. Children from the Hardins- 
-burg Training School are sing- 
ing spirituals. The local high 
school glee club will do 'America 
The Beautiful" and "The Battle 
Hymn of the Republic". Other 
music will be a ballad sung by 
Mrs. Jesse T. Beard, dressed as 
Nancy Hanks. Bobby Teaff will 
review Sandburgs version of the 
boyhood of Lincoln. Murray 
Beard will pay a tribute to Lin- 
coln recounting local incidents 
centering around the Lincoln 
family. Melvin Duke will im- 
personate President Lincoln giv- 
ing the 2nd inaugural address. 

Those who have helped with 
the program and other parts of 
the celebration are: Mrs. Wilhel- 
mina Beard as co-chairman; 
Presidents of the Civic Clubs, 
Rotary, Rev. O. N. Hoskinson; 
Junior Chamber of Commerce, 



Charlie Hall; Woman's Club, Mrs. 
Loyd Basham, Jr., Veterans 'Of 
Foreign • Wars, Charles Kerr and 
Jesse T. Beard, Mayor of Har- 
dinsburg. Other participants in 
the arrangements for the . cele- 
bration include Don Gago, R. T. 
Dowell, Bob Moorman, Rev. Bob 
Wayne, and chairman from the 
Woman's Clubs in charge of var- 
ious arrangements and decora- 
tions. Mrs. Henry Gibson, Mrs. 
Morris Harrington, Mrs. Frank- 
lin Brite, Mrs. Doyle Bradshaw 
and Mrs. Jack Chambliss. 



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LINCOLN TREK AT C-PORT 
(Continued from page 1) 

Friday morning at 9 a. m. a 
big one-hour-long celebration 
will start in Cloverport. The par- 
ade will leave the Leslie Motel 
promptly at 9 a. m. The Ameri- 
can Legion Color Guard will 
head the parade followed by the 
Fort Knox Military Band. Fol- 
lowing will be the Lincoln fami- 
ly riding in the cart, with father 
Thomas Lincoln riding his horse. 
The parade will proceed down 
main street to the river front to 
the speakers stand. An interest- 
ing program has been arranged. 
George Ganter, Chief Deputy 
of Conservation, will be the guest 
speaker. 

With the band playing "My 
Old Kentucky Home", the cart 
with the Lincoln' family will 
move slowly to the waters edge 
and board the special ferry 
which has been provided to take 
them from the "Hills of old Ken- 
tucky" to the rolling lands of 
Indiana. An appropriate reading 
wiU be given by Mrs. Peggy 
Smith Moore at this time. 

Three Courier-Journal photog- 
raphers and newsmen will cover 
the program and crossing. 



. Cloverport townspeople are 
eagerly awaiting the big Lincoln 
Celebration which v/ill take place 
Friday, October 24, at 9:00 a. m. 
on the river front overlooking 
the Ohio River. 

For year's Cloverport people 
have been eager for the world 
to know Abraham Lincoln cross- 
ed the river there. 

In 1930 a movement was start- 
ed to determine the exact route 
the Lincoln family took in then- 
westward trek. This movement 
led the late Edward Gregory of 
Cloverport and Judge D. D. Dow- 
ell of Hardinsburg to dig into 
old records and documents sup- 
porting facts about the 'Lincoln 
family crossing the Ohio River. 
Until this period historians just 
said "they crossed the river," 
never giving any definite point. 

At a meeting of this Commis- 
sion at Brandenburg July 18, 
1933,' after three years of histor- 
ical research and study, the Com- 
mission designated Cloverport to 
Tobinsport, Ind., to be the "true 
route". Evidence found on rec- 
ords in ^Cannelton, Ind., court- 
house substantiated their claims. 
(Continued on page 7) 



CANNELTON 



N, INDIANA, TUESDAY, OCTOB ER 21, 1958 ,/ 



Gala Events Await Lincoln Trek 

nts In Hoosier Counties 




..Mr: and Mrs. -Thomas- Lincoln A 
and their son Abraham and daugh- - 
ter Sarah will leave Hodgenville, 
Ky., October 22 at 9 a.m. on their 
journey to Indiana. Thomas Lin- 
coln had previously come to In- 
diana looking for a- new home and 
he was pleased with what he found 
in what is now Spencer county. So 
he returned to Kentucky to bring 
his wife and children. 

On this trip they will arrive at 
Knob Creek, Ky., at 11:30 a.m. 
and from there continue on to 
Elizabethtown, Ky., arriving at 
3:30 (Daylight Saving Time) and 
spend the night there. 

October 23 the family will .con- 
tinue' on' to' Hardinsburg, Ky., ar- 
riving at 2 p.m. and continue to 
Cloverport where they will be wel- 
comed at 4 p.m. Here a tea has 
been' arranged for visiting mem- 
j bers of the Lincoln entourage. Mrs. 
Frank Smith is chairman of ar- 
rangements. The party will spend 
the nigh t a t Cloverport. 
**OnFriday7 Oct' 24," the Lincolns 
will cross the Ohio to Tobinsport, 
arriving on the Indiana side of 
the river at 9:30 a.m., to be wel- 
comed to Indiana by Roy Combs, 
state auditor and chairman of the 
i Indiana Lincoln Sesqui-Centennial 

' Com mission.^ ^ ^_ a „_*^«,., 

j Proceeding on to Cannelton the 
i Lincoln party will arrive at the 
riverfront in Cannelton at 10:30 
a.m. for a welcome by Mayor 
Frank Steinsberger and William 
Blythe's band will play. 

At Tell City Mayor Nickolas Beu- 
mel will welcome the party and 
Paul Silke's band will play and 
the group will have luncheon at the 



merican Legion Home enroute to. 
Troy; where the county's main pro- 
gram will be presented. - 
At Lincoln Ferry -i - ■ 

The party will stop at the Lin- 
coln Ferry Roadside Park for the 
program including a talk by Army 
.Major Otis Saalman, president of 
the Perry County Historical So- 
ciety. The Rockport Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce will have its flat- 
boat anchored in Anderson Creek, 
where the boy Lincoln operated a 
ferry. The program at the road- 
side park will be at 2:30 p.m. 

From Troy the Lincolns will con- 
tinue on to the Nancy Hanks Mem- 
orial State Park in Spencer county 
for a program at the Memorial 
Hall at 4 p.m. 

Speakers will include, in addi- 
tion to Roy Combs, chairman of 
the Indiana Lincoln Commission, 
.William Townsend, Kentucky chair- 
man of the Lincoln Sesqui-Centen- 
nial celebration; and Jack Steeg, 
executive secretary of the Indiana 
Lincoln Foundation, and Rhea 
Taylor, Lexington, member .of the 
Kentucky commission. 
Dinner In Evening 

At 7 p.m. William A. Koch is 
entertaining members of the Lin- 
coln party at dinner at Santa 
Clausland. This is the night of the 
opening of the Christmas season 
at Santa Claus Land. Lighting of 
the Christmas candle is always a 
festive part of the celebration. 

Programs are being planned at 
each stop on the Kentucky side of 
the Ohio river just as they are 
being planned on the Indiana side. 
According to historians Hay and 
Nicolay, Thomas Lincoln had con- 



cluded that. Kentucky was • no" 
country for a poor man— the well- 
to-do people owned slaves and had 
adopted a style of gracious living 
and* the less fortunate were not 
among these. 

Thomas had heard of the vast 
amount of unoccupied land in In- 
diana (Perry county) and thither 
he determined to go. He built a 
rude raft loaded it with his kit of 
tools, and four hundred gallons 
of whiskey and trusted his for- 
tunes to the winding water course. 
According to the historians he 
met with only one accident— his 
raft capsized and his tool kit and 
liquor was dropped into the water. 
However, he was able to save the 
tool kit and much of the spirits 
and proceeded on his way. 

On this trip he stopped at the 
home of a settler named Po?ey; 
and according to Nicolay and Hay, 
Lincoln selected a spot that 
pleased him in his first day's jour- 
ney. A vigorous frontiersman like 
Thomas Lincoln would think noth- 
ing of walking 16 miles between 
sunrise and sunset, that being the 
distance from Troy to the place 
where he stopped. 

The historians said Thomas Lin- 
coln walked back to his home in 
Knob Creek, Ky., and brought his 
wife and two children — Sarah and 
Abraham with him to their new 
home in Indiana. Abraham was 
then seven years of age in 1S16. 

On the second trip they brought 
their belongings including a couple 
of horses and a cow and a few 
household goods. This time they 
had to cross the river on a raft but 
so far as is known, there was no 
mishap on this trip. 



■ 



' 



1-THE CANNELTON (IND.) NEWS: Tues., Oct. 21, 1958 / 



r 




ins 



Elaboral 

For Pilgrimage 

Trek Will Call 
For Night Stopover 
At Cloverport 

Cloverport, Kentucky is complet- 
ing elaborate plans to entertain 
the Lincoln pilgrimage group 
Thursday night and early Friday 
.morning as it makes a stopover 
there prior to entering Indiana.. 
• The Lincoln Trek is due to ar- 
rive in Hardinsburg on Thursday, 
October 23, at about 2 p.m. The 
Veterans of Foreign Wars Color 
Guard will meet and escort the 
group to the courthouse yard where 
a program has been planned. Mrs. 
Wathen Tobin is local chairman of 
the celebration. 

-The Hardinsburg Woman's Club 
will decorate the city, furnish the 
necessary background, and supply 
the speaker's, stand. 

Mrs. Lloyd Basham, jr., presi- 
dent of the Club, has announced 
the following committees: Mrs. 
Franklin Brite, costumes; Mrs. V. 
A. Bradshaw, covered wagons; 
Mrs. Jack Chamblis's, speakers' 
stand; Mrs. Morris Harrington, ap- 
propriate entrance for the migra- 
tion. . 

In a desire to make the celebra- 
tion a community project rather 
than entirely a club project, Mrs. 
Basham urges all citizens. to assist 
the -Club in its activities. 
Cloverport Celebration 
. An hour-long celebration at 
Cloverport on Friday, October 24, 
will bring the climax to the Ken- 
tucky portion of the trek v/ith the 
re-enactment of the river crossing. 

The party will reach' Cloverport 
on the afternoon of Oct. 23, where 
tenative plans are under way to 
entertain members of the party. 

The program will begin at 9 
a.m. with a parade from the east 
end of Cloverport and will' consist 
of the ox cart, with their few house- 
hold belongings, three horses, the 
family led by the Fort Knox Arm- 
ored Band and the Cannfclton High 
School Band. 

The speaker's stand will be lo- 
cated on the banks overlooking the 
Ohio River near the first Baptist 
Church. 

Mrs. Frank Smith has been ap- 
pointed chairman of the Clover- 
port celebration and will be assist- 
ed by L.J. Behen, co-chairman. 
Kenneth Coleman will act as Mas- 
ter of Ceremonies. 

Historians, photographers and 
newsmen will cover the crossing 
at the river. The Cloverport School 
and the St. Rose Parochial School 
will dismiss classes during the 
celebration. 




& gotattty 



&g£7 







Margarete G. Smith 
Pvui Cloverport Historian 

'" v Cloverport, Ky. 40111 



Hardinsburg, Ky., — Friday, October 17, 195& 




The sesquicentennial of the 
birth of Abraham Lincoln will be 
observed in 1959 throughout the 
United States. The Lincoln Trek 
Celebration Committee plans to 
commemorate the trip of the 
Lincoln family from their home 
near Hodgenville to their new 
home in Indiana by re-enacting 
the trip on October 22-24. 

Announced plans call for the 
trek to start at Knob Creek near 
Hodgenville and contin.ue 
through Hardinsburg and Clov- 
erport where the party will cross 
the Ohio River into Indiana. 

Representing the Lincoln fami- 
ly, will be two Kentuckians tak- 
ing the part of Tom and Nancy 
Hanks Lincoln, and two children 
from Indiana as Abraham and 
Sarah. 

The Lincoln Trek is due to ar- 
rive in Hardinsburg on Thurs- 
day, October 23, at about 2 p. m. 
The Veterans of Foreign Wars 
Color Guard will meet and es- 



cort the group to the courthouse 
yard where a program has been 
planned. Mrs. Wathen Tobin is 
local chairman of the celebration. 

The Hardinsburg W o m a n's 
Club will decorate the city, fur- 
nish the necessary background, 
and supply the speaker's stand. 

Mrs. Loyd Basham, Jr., presi- 
dent of the Club, has announced 
the following committees: Mrs. 
Franklin Brite, costumes; Mrs. 
V. A. Bradshaw, covered wag- 
ons; Mrs. Jack Chambliss, speak- 
ers' stand; Mrs. Morris Harring- 
ton, appropriate entrance for the 
migration. 

In a desire to make the cele- 
bration a community project 
rather than entirely a club pro- 
ject, Mrs. Basham urges all citi- 
zens to assist the Club in its ac- 
tivities. 
Cloverport Celebration^ 

An hour-long celebration at 



Cloverport on Friday, October 
24, will bring the climax to the 
Kentucky portion of the trek 
with the re-enactment of the 
river crossing. 

The p^artY_will_ reach Clover - 
port on the afternoon of Oct. 23, 
where tenative plans' are under 
way to entertain members of the 

party. 

Appropriate will be the cross- 
ing at Cloverport for it was in 
the year of 1816 the Lincolns set 
out for Indiana with their few 
belongings and came to Clover- 
port to cross into Indiana. After 
a night's rest they built a raft 
of logs and crossed the two- 
wheel ox cart and family over 
on the raft. The cattle were 
made to swim across. They were 
ferried by Jacob Weatherholt, 
Sr., who had a licensed ferry a- 
i bove the mouth of Clover Creek. 

The program will begin at 9 | 
a. m. with a parade from the east 
end of Cloverport and will con- 
sist of the ox cart, with then- 
few household belongings, three 
horses the family led by the 
Fort Knox Armored Band and 
the Cannelton High School Band. 
The speaker's stand will be 
located on the banks overlooking 
the Ohio River near the first 
Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Frank Smith has be >n ap- 
pointed chairman "of the Clov- 
erport celebration and will be 
assisted by L. J. Behen, co-chair- 
man. Kenneth Coleman will act 
as Master of Ceremonies. 

Historians, photographers and 
newsmen will cover the crossing 
at the river. The Cloverport 
School and the SL Rose Paro- 
chial School will dismiss classes 
during the celebration. 



i- 





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1958 



Pictures To Appear 
In Roto Magazine 
In November 

The Lincoln Sesquicentennial 
in its entire coverage will appear 
in color in the Magazine Section 
of the Sunday Courier-Journal 
the latter part of November ac- 
cording to Joe Creason, feature 
writer. If -you are interested in 
receiving additional copies of 
this' issue, notify - your Courier- 
Journal carrier in your vicinity 
and he will place your name on 
a list in time for additional pap- 
ers. In Cloverport call Charles 
Pate, SU 8-3421.- . 



:,- ■ 




e ice- 



Trip, Beginning at Hodgenville., 
First Sesquicentennial Event 

By JOE REISTER . 

The Courier-Journal Lexington Bureau 

Lexington, Ky., Oct. 15. — A 125-mile trek taken, by 
Abraham Lincoln's family in a horse-drawn covered wagon, 
when they moved from Kentucky into Indiana in 1816, will 
be re-enacted starting Wednesday at Hodgenville, birthplace 
of the 16th President. 

T . ... , ., ... , . , . , where another celebration will 

_ It will be the first event held be hdd Fred Howard Knob 

in connection with Kentucky s Creek dy& Jead wiU be chah ._ 

celebration next year of the Lia- man of arrangem ents for the 

coin Sesquicentennial. celebration in that community. 
Details of the trek were an- 



nounced here Wednesday by Dr. 
Rhea A. Taylor, executive direc- 
tor of the Kentucky Lincoln 
S e s quicentennial Commission. 
He is professor of history at the 
University of Kentucky. 

Danvillian Has Role 



To Halt at Elizabethtown 

The entourage will then move 
on to Elizabethtown, where a 
celebration is scheduled for 3:30 
p.m. under direction of Ray 
Jenkins. The touring group 
will spend the night in Eliza- 



Two Kentuckians and two bethtown Taylor said 



residents of Indiana will portray 
the parts of the four members 



Actually, the horse - drawn 
covered wagon and the four 



of the Lincoln family who made n^ 6 " of the "Lincoln fam 



the original trek from Hodgen 
ville to Lincoln City, Ind., 142 
years, ago. Little, Abe Lincoln 
was 8 years old at the time. 

Eben Henson, Danville theatri- 
cal producer and actor, will 



ily" will be transported from 
town to town along the trek in 
a large Army van from Fort 
Knox, Taylor said. 

On October 23, the group will 
go to Hardinsburg, where at 2 



portray the part of Thomas Lin- P-m. it will be greeted by citi- 

coln, Abe's father, in the re- zens there - Mrs - Wathen Tobin, 

enactment of the trek. Hardinsburg, is in charge of the 

Mrs. Mary Genevieve Edwards, celebration there. Later in the 

Lexington, will take the part day, the group will proceed to 

of Nancy Hanks Lincoln. Wil- Cloverport to spend the night. 

liam Ryder, 11-year-old Indiana Indiana Plans Festivities 



boy, will be Abe. The part o 
Sarah Lincoln, Abe's sister, will 
be taken by Miss Constance 
Combs, 11, also of Indiana 

To Start Wednesday 



1} «, 

J Will 

< Frai 
/of a 



e nelQ at Cloverport.' Mrs. 



Frank Smith will be in charge 
of arrangements for the Clover- 
I port celebration. 
The trek is scheduled to start Later in the day, the group 
from Hodgenville next Wednes- will cross the Ohio River at 
day morning, Taylor said. At 9 Cloverport and go into Indiana, 
a.m that day, a celebration Will At Cannelton, Ind., there will 
be held in Hodgenville to signal be a celebration at 10:30 a.m. 
the start of the "trip." Mrs. October 24, Taylor said. Cele- 
Dalph Creel, Hodgenville, is brations also will be held _ at 
chairman of arrangements for Tell City and at Lincoln City. 
the celebration there. That night, the trek will be 

From Hodgenville the Lin- terminated at Santa Claus, In 
coin party will go to Knob diana, where a banquet will be 
Creek, about 10 miles distant, Jicld,., . .... . . .. tv . 









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THE LINCOLN FAMILY CROSSED THE OHIO RIVER from 
Cloverport on this ferry after the early morning program at the 
roadside park last Friday. Mrs. Frank Smith was in charge of 
the program at Cloverport. — Photo by Thos. D. Trent. 



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•;•:■ VIS 







TfiJlvT ACROSS INT© INDIANA 



The travelers wave as their horses strain to pull the jolt wagon uphill from the ferry land- 
ing at Tobinsport, Ind. From Tobinsport, they went through Cannelton and Tell City 
to the area where Thomas Lincoln settled his family and where young Lincoln grew up. 



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After two days of celebrations from Hodgenville to Clover- 
port, the pseudo-Lincolns wave goodby to the Kentucky 
shore as they cross the Ohio on a ferry bound for Indiana. 



"Farewell To Thee" -.Fort Knox Band 

Fare-well to thee, 

Fare-well to thee, 

The wind will carry back thy sad refrain, 

One fond fare-well, before you now depart, 

Until we meet again. 



CUt OJl^^s.jO^M-^Jt' 



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County 



Peo 



And Cloverpo rt . . . 



Margarete G. Smith 
f\jA Clo»erport Historian 
<^ V Cloverport, Ky. 40111 




By Mrs. Frank Smith 
The re-enactment of the Lin- 
coln crossing at Cloverport Fri- 
day morning, October 24 was a 
climax to the Kentucky portion 
of "The Lincoln Trek", which was 
an opening gun in the Linclon 
Sesquicentennial which gets in- 
to full swing next year. 

An estimated crowd of 2,000 
people stood on the Cloverport 
bank of the Ohio and witnessed 
] the crowning climax of the three 
• day trek which carried the Lin- 
I coin family from his birthplace 
i in Larue County to the soil of 
I Tobinsport, Indiana. 

One hundred and forty-two 
years ago, Thomas Lincoln de- 
cided the vast un-occupied lands 
of Indiana were more productive 
and that he would move his fami- 
ly. He built a crude raft, loaded 
it with the necessary things and 
made the trip down stream alone. 
Historians tell us he walked back 
to his home at Knob Creek and 
prepared his family for the long 
trip. 

Thomas Lincoln being a sur- 
veyor himself had knowledge of 
the roads through Breckinridge 
County and that beyond Joeville 
(now Cloverport) there were on 
ly beaten tracks. He set out in 
December 1816 and came to Joe- 
ville, consisting of his family, 
cart, etc. They were told in Har- 
dinsburg they would find a lic- 
ensed ferry and Mr. Jacob 
Weatherholt, St., would ferry 
them across. After a night's rest 
Thomas Lincoln with the help of 
Mr. Weatherholt fastened togeth-j 
er a raft of logs and set the cart 
and the family across the river. 
The oxen and the cow were made' 
to swim across. 

The following night they 

camped at Lafayette Springs and), 

then made their way to Cannel-S 

ton, Troy and on to Spencer 

County, Indiana. 



Years later when Abraham 
Lincoln was elected President of 
the United States, Mr. Jacob 
Weatherholt, Jr., saw it would 
be wise to record the crossing 
as history for the future gener- 
ations, and for the purpose of 
leaving undeniable proof to his 
posterity that his father, Jacob 
Weatherholt, Sr., had ferried 
Thomas Lincoln and his family 
across the river in 1816. On Aug- 
ust 20, 1866 he recorded the in- 
cident in Deed Book A Page 8 
and 9, at the courthouse in Can- 
nelton, Ind., the following state- 
ment . "From the hills of Old 
Kentucky, I ferried Thomas Lin- 
coln, his wife, Nancy, daughter 
Sarah, and son Abraham, on a 
raft of logs from above the 
mouth of Clover Creek at Joe- 
ville (now Cloverport) to the 
rolling land of Indiana". 

Quite a contrast from the days 
of 1816 to 1958 when Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Lincoln, their dau- 
ghter. Sarah and son Abraham 
arrived on a beautiful October 
afternoon in Cloverport. A wel- 
coming party was waiting to 
greet them in town for a gala 
celebration by the townspeople 
the next day. They were enter- 
tained with a tea, and invited 
out to dinner, and were over 
night guests in the town. 

As the evening drew near and 
darkness came there were no 
thoughts in father Thomas Lin- 
coln's mind of how he would 
cross the river, there were no 
family chores to be done by fath- 
er an *. mother, no feeding of the 
cattle to be done. Probably the 
real Thomas awakened during 
the night wondering about the 
raft he must build the next day, 
the hazardous trip across the 
river, and how would the cattle 
swim the river . . . not so in 195S 
as in 1816, for lying at the dock 
was a beautiful sight, the sight 
of a well constructed ferry boat 
with experienced engineers that 
would safely take him from his 
Kentucky home to the adopted 
state of Indiana. 



The morning of his departure 
was a gala event at 9 a. m. when 
a huge crowd came to bid them 
farewell, a military band, fine 
speaker, master of ceremonies, 
dignitaries all around with a fair 
young lady to eulogize over their 
departure. 

As the band played "My Old 
Kentucky Home" the crowd 
watched the boat slowly leave the 
Kentucky shore. It left the 
tracks of the Lincoln family 
moulded in the soil of the state 
of Abraham Lincoln's birth. 
Storms, waves and floods will 
never efface them. They will en- 
dure forever. And as the slowly 
moving raft left the shore the 
family took one last look at the 
hills of Kentucky, Nancy never 
to return. The hand of Kentucky 
reached across the bosom of the 
Ohio to grasp the hand of Ind- 
iana as the strains of "Auld Lang 
Syne" were heard and the crowd 
bade them farewell with cheers 
and hand-waving. As the boat 
moved closer and closer to the 
Indiana shore our hearts were 
made a little sad. We were a- 
! wakened to the fact that Lincoln 
was not leaving and we are re- 
minded of those words "we will 
meet again" . . . 

Fare-well to thee, 

•Fare- well to thee, 

The wind will carry back thy 
sad refrain, 
-One fend fare- well, before you 
now depart, 

Until we meet again. 
. . . And so we bring our Lincoln 
crossing and celebration to a 
close. 

The spirit of hospitality was a- 1 
bundant, the co-operation wasj 
beautiful and the future may' 
hold a lot in store. 







; 











ON TO CI,OVEKP©3IT . . . 



William H. Townsend, Lexington, a Lin- 
coln scholar who took part in Cloverport 
festivities, wears watch which Lincoln wore 
when he was killed. The fob is a cuff- 
link also worn by the 16th President. At 
right, a crowd at Cloverport bids formal 
farewell to Indiana-bound Lincoln family. 




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PROGRAM 



LINCOLN SESQUICENTENNIAL 

CLOVERPORT. KENTUCKY 
OCTOBER 24. 1958 - 9:00 A. M. 

Parade led by American Legion Color Guard and Fort Knox Band 

Music: Fort Knox Band 

Invocation: Reverend G. C. Sandusky 

Welcome: Mayor Earl Hobbs, Jr. 

Recognition of Visitors: Air. Kenneth Coleman 

Address: Mr. George Ganter, Deputy Commissioner of Conservation 

History of Lincoln Crossing: Mrs. Peggy Smith Moore 

"My Old Kentucky Home"' - Fort Knox Band 

'•Farewell To Thee" - Fort Knox Band 



Fare-well to thee, 

Fare-well to thee, 

The wind will carry back thy sad refrain, 

One fond fare-well, before you now depart, 

Until we meet again. 



You are cordially invited to attend a 

I CCl 

honoring members of tke Lincoln 
Oesquicentennial Trek 
rkiirsday. October 23 

/ our o'clock 
First Baptist Ckurcn 

Clov?erpoct Lincoln Committee 



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Crowds, bands and big doings marked 
passage of the latter-day Lincolns 



%£ spot where the family erected a cabin and 
where the mother of the President is buried. 
Programs were held at all those stops. 

Although the original Lincolns traveled in 
a cart pulled by two giant oxen all the 120 
miles or more to Indiana, the wagon in which 
their impersonators rode through the towns 
they visited along their way was drawn by two 
horses. Otherwise, in order to speed up the 
proceedings, the period-costumed characters 
rode from' town to town in automobiles, while 
the horses, wagon and the cow that trailed 
behind the caravan was transported in vehicles 
made available by the Fort Knox Armor 
Center. ' 

Eben Henson of Danville played the part 
of Thomas Lincoln, while Mrs. Mary 
Genevieve Edwards of Lexington was his wife, 
Nancy Hanks. William Rider, Jr., a 14-year- 
old former Indiana resident, was young Abe 
Lincoln, and Carolyn Combs, an 11-year-old 
Indianapolis girl, was his sister Sarah. 

Large crowds and bands and speakers 
turned out to meet the travelers and to take 
part in the doings at all stops. Local high 
school bands added to the occasion at Hodgen- 
ville, Elizabethtown, Tell City and Cannelton. 
The Louisville du Pont High School band, 
along with local grade- and high-school 
. choruses, performed at Hardinsburg, and the 
Fort Knox Post band at Cloverport. 

At Hardinsburg and at Cloverport crowds 
larger than the population of the towns were 
on hand. 

More than 100 costumed women, some of 
them wearing dresses that go back to the 
early 19th Century, took part in the Hardins- 
burg program. Downtown streets were deco- 



^«WK»e^^?»^.f^."*#jrt 



rated with flags, and stores displayed antiques. 
One authentic antique on display was a flax 
wheel which actually belonged to Nancy Hanks 
Lincoln. 

The Cloverport program was highlighted 
by the re-enactment of the Lincolns crossing 
the river. History had to be altered somewhat 
for that event, too. While the real Lincolns 
were poled across the narrow, shallow stream 
on a flatboat, the actors playing their parts 
crossed the river (which now has a width of 
more than - a quarter of a mile, thanks to 
navigation dams) on a motor-propelled barge 
borrowed for the day. 

The stop at Lncoln Ferry Park, like the 
earlier one at Hodgenville, didn't fit into the 
1816 migration, but it was thrown in for the 
re-enactment because of its authentic associa- 
tion with the President It was there, as a boy 
of 17, Lincoln operated a ferry across Ander- 
son River a short distance above the point 
where it flows into the Ohio. 

And it was there he was arrested . and 
haled before Kentucky Justice of the Peace 
Samuel Pate for carrying passengers on his 
flatboat out to board passing river steamers. 

All hands involved in the revival of the 
Lincoln trek were impressed with the way 
the local communities co-operated. Everything 
went well, and on schedule, from start to 
finish. 

The nearest thing to a slip was averted 
by a last-minute musical change at Hodgen- 
ville. There the band was all set to swing 
into "Dixie," the theme song of unreconstruct- 
ed rebels, as the wagon passed by with the 
boy who was to become President of the 
Union during the Civil War. 




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Taking part in the mod- 
ern version of the Lin- 
colns' journey from Ken- 
tucky to Indiana were 
two of the leading Lincoln 
scholars, Dr. Gerald Mc- 
Murtry, left, director of 
the Lincoln Life Founda- 
tion at Fort Wayne, Ind., 
and Dr. Louis A. Warren, 
director emeritus of the 
historical organization. 






£i£i.->di* 




THE BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY HERALD-NEWS 
HARDINSBURG, KY., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31. 1958 










A DIRECT DESCENDANT OF NANCY HANKS LINCOLN, 
Mrs. Emma Weisenberg, Cloverport, (right) talked with Mrs. 
Genevieve Edwards, Lexington, who portrayed Nancy Lincoln. 
—Photo by Thos. D. Trent. 









Q - ^t**-«ii>»-<«— v-» 



*«*-> 



_*««-»-•< 






Margarete G. Smith 
Cloverport Historian 

Lincoln Trek Cast 
Feted In Cloverport 

Re-enactment of the Lincoln 
migration from Kentucky to 
Indiana reached the Ohio River 
town of Cloverport Thursday af- 
ternoon and with the re-enact- 
ment of the crossing on Friday 
morning brought a climax to the 
Kentucky portion of the Trek. 

On hand to greet members of 
the entourage was Cloverport 
Mayor Earl Hobbs, Jr., who ex- 
tended a most gracious welcome. 
A tea was held from 4 to 5 o'clock 
in the afternoon at the First Bap- 
tist Church where there was one 
hundred or more present. At 7:30 
o'clock thirty-five members of the 
Trek and guests were entertain- 
ed with a dinner at the Grant 
Memorial Methodist Church. 

Among the notables entertain- 
ed and who remained to be guests 
over-night were Attorney Wil- 
liam Townsend, Lexington, chair- 
man of the Kentucky Commis- 
sion, Mrs. Townsend and their 
daughter, Mrs. Mary Genevieve 
Edwards who portrayed the part 
of Nancy Lincoln; Dr. Rhea A. 
Taylor, Lexington, Executive 
Director of the Kentucky Com- 
mission and Mrs. Taylor; Mr. Roy 
Combs, chairman of the Indiana 
Commission and State Auditor of 
Indiana, Mrs. Combs and their 
daughter, Constance who por- 
trayed Sarah Lincoln; Col. Eben 
Henson, director of the Frontier 
Playhouse, Danville, who por- 
trayed Thomas Lincoln; William 
Rider, Jr., of Indianapolis, Ind., 
who portrayed young Abe Lin- 
coln; Joe Creason, feature writer 
for the Courier-Journal; H. Har- 
old Davis, chief photographer of 
the Courier-Journal; John E. 
Steeg, Jr., Indianapolis, Ind., Ex- 
ecutive Secretary of the Indiana 
Lincoln Foundation; Jack Hud- 
gions, Tri-State Editor, Evans- 
ville Courier; Mr. Ivoy Johnson, 
the farmer who furnished the 
covered wagon, livestock and 
team of horses; four U. S. Serv- 
iceman from Fort Knox; par- 
ents and grandparents and rela- 
tives who also made the trip. 

Mr. Joe Creason and Mr. Har- 
old Davis were over-night guests 
in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Bowne. Other guests stop- 
ped at the LeslieJMfotel and the 
Pate House. 



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weekly Hobby, ArOiqm, Auctidn & Collectors- Newspaper /orOMo^Keniu*^^ . , 

ImTois, western Pa., No. W. V«, Tmnessee^mscon^, 



I at Knightstown, !nd. 4614b • 



Over 30,000 Distributed Each Week J 

Lincoln Family Trail 



Jan, 23, 1971 



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Marker Placed at 
Cloverport, Ky. 

• Just where did the Thomas Lincoln fa- 
mily cross the Ohio River when they left 
Knob Creek farm to. make a new hom& 
in Spencer County, Ind.? 

Historians have long disagreed on their 
exact route, but residents of Cloverport, 
Ky., "know for certain" that the crossing 
took place at Cloverport. And the Kentucky 
Historical Society, after much research, a- 
greed with them. Upon the Society's recom- 
mendation, in 1954, an official historical 
marker was placed near Cloverport mark- 
ing the site of the crossing. 

According to an article written in 1953 
by Joe Creason for the Louisville Courier- 
Journal, "Not an awful let of concrete evir. 
dence exists as to the route over which, 
or even the exact day when, the Lincolns 
left Kentucky . .. . 

The best evidence indicates that the Lin- 
colns spent their first night on the road 
with relatives at^ Mill Creek, a tiny set- 
tlement which long since has been swal- 
lowed up" inside the sprawling Fort Knox 
military reservation. From there, they in- 
ched on through Elizabethtown, past Fish- 
erty, .Big Spring and Hardinsburg in 
a northwesterly direction and finally cama 
to a ferry crossing somewhere on the Ohio 
River. - 

Experts long have disagreed violently a9 
to just where the ferry. was located. But 
most seem to feel it was at or near Joe- 
ville, now Cloverport To say the least, 
it is definite that a road— and there were- 
n't too many in those days— led frcm Eliza- 
bethtown to Joeville, where a licensed ferry 
had been operating since 1802." 

""Margaret ©.'* Smith, Cloverport historian, 
now leads the effort to gain recognition 
for the part the town played in the historic- 
Lincoln journey from Kentucky to Indiana. 
She is the daughter of the late Edward 
Gregory, who pioneered research on tr.e 
route back in the 1930s. In his booklet, 
"At the End of the Trail" he documents 
his findings. 



•? FERRY 

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CLOVERPORT - TOBINSPORT FERRY LANDING BEFORE 1940. 

CANNELTON, INDIANA, TUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1963 : 

• y ; / - " A 



'"■"*"!?' 




LINCOLN: Tobinsport and 
Cloverport have long main- 
tained, with considerable 
authority, that the Thomas 
.Lincoln Family crossed the 
Ohio River into Indiana, on 







its travels to a new home 
near Gentryville at their 
sites on the river. At the left, 
Mrs. Robert Stilwell looks 
over a sign that advertised 
the Cloverport and Tobin- 



sport Ferry years ago be- 
fore that facility ceased 
operation. The sign cites the 
fact travelers can "Follow 
Lincoln's Trail." This sign is 
maintained as a relic by 



Mrs. Stilwell and her fath- 
er, C.E. Tinsley. 

In 1932, June 2, to be 
exact, a aiant Indiana Lin- 
coln Memorial Way Cele- 
bration was held at Cannel- 



ton and Tell City. The pic- 
ture in the center, shows the 
crowd at the court house in 
Cannelton, as it listened to 
Governor Harry G. Leslie 
officially proclaim the offici- 



al Lincoln Highway. 

That night, in Tell City at 
St. Paul's school dining 
room, a banquet and pro- 
gram added to this affair. 
Attending both events, as 



well as Governor Leslie, 
were members of the Lincoln 
Trail Commissions from In- 
diana, Kentucky and Illinois. 
At the right is a sign that 
is familiar to people who 



used to follow the Lincoln 
Route via the Cloverport 
and Tobinsport ferry. It 
carried this message, "Cor- 
rect Crossing Of Lincoln 
Family in 1816" and added, 



"Excellent road via LaFay- 
ette Springs to Cannelton, 
connecting State Roads 64 
and 37 for Tell City, Boon- 
ville, Evansvilie and all 
roads leading West." 



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In this day and age, when 
people are thinking more and 
more about Abraham Lincoln, 
it will be well for Perry Coun- 
tians to remember that their 
own community of Tobinsport 
has a strong claim to the hon- 
or of being the site where the 
Civil War president, as a boy, 
ferried with his family into 
Indiana, seeking a new heme. 

To this day, there are strong 
claims from other communi- 
ties, including the one near 
Troy and Lewisport. However, 
Tobinsport, and of course 
Cloverport, will not take a 
back seat to anyone in pointing 
out reasons why the crossing 
was made there. 

In 1958, during Lincoln's 
Sesquicentennial anniversary, 
sponsors of a trek as a reen- 
actment of the trip from 
Hodgenville to Springfield, by 
the Lincolns, recognized the 
Tobinsport-Cloverport cross- 
ing by bringing the caravan 
across the Ohio at those 
points. In 1963, the sponsors 
of a gigantic Lincoln Heritage 
Trail, also recognized the 
Tobinsport-Cloverport site by 
adding it to attractive broch- 
ures that will be distributed 
all over the land. A total of 
1,000,000 of these brochures 
will be used. 



CANNELTON 




Two women are ready to 
stand and be counted anytime 
the subject of Lincoln's cross- 
ing into Indiana is discussed. 
They are Mrs. Robert Stilwell 
of Tobinsport and Mrs. Frank 
Smith of Cloverport. Each 
owns many documents to back 
their statements. 
! MRS. SMITH is the cteught er 
of Edward Gregory, who' col- 
lected reams of "proof" that 
the Lincolns crossed into In- 
diana at Cloverport-Tobin- 
sport. Mr. Gregory once wrote 
a booklet, "At The End Of 
The Trail" in which he docu- 
ments the journey of Thomas 
Lincoln and his family through 
Hardin and Breckinridge 
Counties, to Indiana in 1816. 
He was secretary of a Breck- 
inridge-Perry County Lincoln 
Highway ; Association of the 
1920s and early '30s that also 
included D.D. Dowell, presi- 
dent; E.D. Jones, vice presi- 
dent; J.C. Nolte, treasurer. 
The booklet was published in 
1938. 

Their records, explained in 
the booklet, show that in 
Breckinridge county records a 
license to operate a ferry at 
Joeville was granted Joseph 
Houston, with John Pate as 
security, by the court on Octo- 
ber 15, 1802. This proves that 
14 years before Lincoln cross- 
ed the Ohio, a ferry existed at 
Joeville, the town known now 
as Cloverport. 

Information also shows that 
a road led from Elizabeth- 
town, Ky. to Joeville. This 
made an ideal path for the 
Lincoln family to follow. His- 
tory also shows that Hardin 
and Breckinridge Counties 
were stamping grounds for the 
Lincolns. 



diana statutes, I would sug- 
gest that local historians rise 
to the challenge and deter- 
mine the route supported by 
the best evidence." 

Tobinsport and Cloverport 
adherents of "their crossing" 
are ready to rise to that chal- 
lenge. They invite the assist- 
ance of anyone willing to join 
the crusade. 

There are discussions now of 
marking the route to Tobin- 
sport from Cannelton, citing 
the word that the Tobinsport- 



■■■i. -■■-"-■-.• ■-._ 



Cloverport point on "the Ohio 
River has a strong claim to 
this honor. With historians and 
Lincoln Lore lovers sure to be 
coming this way in the sum- 
mer of 1963, it would be well I 
for Tobinsport people and per- 
haps Cannelton organizations 
to join to see that this route j 
is properly marked. The soon- 
er this is done, the more like- 
ly, outside help will come that I 
might offer just the kind of I 
proof needed to establish the 
fact even further. jty^J 



THE GREGORY booklet 
states that later in life, Abra- 
ham Lincoln recalled his trip, 
as a boy, through Hardins- 
burg and that he told of pass- 
ing through that community 
on the way to Joeville, where 
they were ferried across the 
Ohio by Jacob Weatherholt, 
who built a raft of logs to. 
carry the cart, while the oxen 
and cow were made to swim. 
This booklet, the News was 
informed, is being prepared 

for reprinting in the near fu^. 
ture. The ones in existence 
have become real collectors' 
items. 

An affidavit in the book car- 
ries a statement of " George 
Tobin Weatherholt, who was a 
grandson of Jacob Weather- 
holt, jr. who wrote his mem- 
ories and offered this state- 
ment — 
"I; ferried Thomas Lincoln 
i and his . wife Nancy, and a 
(daughter and his son,. Abra- 
ham, from the hills of Ken- ! 
tucky to Indiana, on a raft 
made of logs, from above the j 
mouth of Clover Creek at' 
Cloverport, Kentucky, in 1816, 

signed, Jacob Weatherholt, 
sr.". 

Mrs. Stilwell owns many 
newspapers that carry stories 
of the Lincoln route and 
events honoring Lincoln, as 
well as referring to his travels 
in this area. One is a copy of 

the_ Vincennes Commercial, 

which discusses the Lincoln 
Trail, s 1830-1930. Another is a 
copy of the Breckinridge News 
of October 16, 1929 which car- 
ries interesting facts about 
The Lincoln Family Crossing 
at Cloverport. Others are the 
Evansville Courier and Journ- 
al of May 3, 1931, The Cannel- 
ton Telephone. 



JLJvl^. 



Jo* 







LLOYD WHITMER, prose- 
cuting attorney of Perry Conn-, 
ty; in a letter to The News on 
March 8, this year, issued a 
challenge forhistorians to con- 
tinue to search for positive 
proof where the Lincoln's 
crossed the Ohio River. He 
wrote at the time the recent 
state legislature repealed an 
act that named Cannelton as 
the official crossing. This was 
done when some scores of 
obsolete laws were wiped from 
the books. 

Mr. Whitmer said; "Now 
that the "official" way is no 
longer designated in the In- 









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ILLINOIS 





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The nation this year is observing the 150th anniversary of the birth of its 16th 
President, Abraham Lincoln. 

In folklore an American President, ideally, is a self-made man who was born in a 
little log cabin and endured hardships as he passed through boyhood. 

Abraham Lincoln was the embodiment of this concept, for when he was born on 
February 12, 1809, the event occurred in a one-windowed, dirt-floored log cabin whose 
walls were chinked with mud; there were many hardships connected with life during the 
pioneer years in which he was growing up, and he was almost wholly self-educated and 
self-made. 

Much has been said and written about the Lincoln heritage — a heritage that went 
with him to Washington as he served during the time of the Lnited States's greatest peril. 



Statue of Abraham Lincoln at Hodgen- 
ville, Kentucky, near the birthplace of the 
nation's 16th President, gave this youth 
inspiration for his role a; the boy Lincoln 
in a re-enactment of the Lincoln family's 
trekfrom Kentucky to new home in Indiana. 



12 



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This heritage is one that was gained in Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, three of the 
states inj which Texas Gas operates its 3,700-mile pipeline system. 

Sections of these three states, collectively termed Lincolnland, are the scenes this 
year of special observances of events concerned with Lincoln's life and are being visited 
by many seekers of Lincolnlore. As these visitors retrace the paths along which Lincoln 
left his footprints, they cross and criss-cross the routes of the pipelines by which Texas 
Gas serves an important part of America — an America that has grown greater by far 
than Lincoln could have most fondly dreamed. 

Whether those seeking Lincolnlore are serious students of his life or are merely 
interested citizens of the nation he loved and served, they find many places to visit in 
Lincolnland. The Lincoln states — Kentucky, where he was born and lived until he was 
seven years old; Indiana, where he spent his formative years and grew to manhood, and 
Illinois, where he increased in stature until he was placed in the nation's highest office — 
are rich in Lincoln history. 

Two months before the future President was to be born his parents, Thomas Lincoln 
and Nancy Hanks Lincoln, and his sister, Sarah, settled near Hodgenville, Kentucky. It 
was here, on a bleak winter day, that young Abraham came into the world, and it is here 
that the cabin in which his birth occurred is now housed in a stately pink granite 
memorial. 

Eight miles from the Lincoln birthplace is Knob Creek. Here, in 1811, another 
log cabin became home to the boy Lincoln, his parents and his sister. It was a pathetic- 
looking family of four that, five years later, loaded into an ox-drawn jolt wagon and left 
Knob Creek for a new home in Indiana. 

On the journey to Indiana the Lincolns followed a route that, from evidence avail- 
able to historians, closely paralleled a part of today's Texas Gas mainline system. A few 
months ago, when the trip was re-enacted under sponsorship of the Kentucky and Indiana 
Lincoln sesquicentennial commissions, the re-enacting group crossed over Texas Gas 
pipelines three times and passed the Company's Hardinsburg, Kentucky, compressor 
station. Townspeople along the route, and especially at Hardinsburg, were in costume 
for the occasion. 

In order to cross the Ohio River from Kentucky to Indiana, the Lincolns had to 
seek out a ferry. They found one, historians say, at Joeville, which now is Cloverport. 
Here again they came into what is now a Texas Gas pipeline system area, and here they 
crossed the Ohio River just a few miles from places at which two Texas Gas submarine 
pipelines today cross the river into Indiana. 




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I Cloverport, Kentucky 

Marker at site where Thomas Lincoln family crossed Ohio River to Indiana in 1816 




t 



POUNMTIO 




NEWSLETTER 



JANUARY 1971 



VOL. 5 NO. 



i 



<i 



LINCOLN FAMILY TRAIL 
MARKER AT CLOVERPORT, KY. 

Just where did the Thomas Lincoln 
family cross the Ohio River when they 
left Knob Creek farm to make a new 
home in Spencer County, Ind. ? 

Historians have long disagreed on 
their exact route, but residents of 
Cloverport, Ky. , "know for certain" 
that the crossing took place at Clover - 
port. And the Kentucky Historical 
Society, after much research, agreed 
with them. Upon the Society's recom- 
mendation, inl954anofficial historical 
marker was placed near Cloverport 
marking the site of the crossing. 

According to an article written in 
1956 by Joe Creason for the Louisville 
Courier -Journal, "Not an awful lot of 
concrete evidence exists as to the route 
over which, or even the exact day when, 
the Lincolns left Kentucky. . . 

The best evidence indicates that 
the Lincolns spent their first night on 
the road with relatives at Mill Creek, 
a tiny settlement which long since has 
been swallowed up inside the sprawling 
Fort Know military reservation. From 
there, they inched on through Elizabeth- 
town, past Fisherty, Big Spring and 
Hardinsburg in a northwesterly direc- 
tion and finally came to a ferry crossing 
somewhere on the Ohio River. 

Experts long have disagreed vio- 
lently as to just where the ferry was 
located. But most seem to feel it was 
at or near Joeville, now Cloverport. 
To say the least, it is definite that a 
road--and there weren't too many in 
those days--led from Elizabethtown to 
Joeville, where a licensed ferry had/ 
been operating since 1802". V 

Margaret A. Smith, Cloverport 
historian, now leads the effort to gain 
recognition for the part the town played 
kin the historic Lincoln journey from 
Kentucky to Indiana. She is the daughter 
of the late Edward Gregory, who pio- 
neered research on the route back in 
the 1930's. In his booklet, "At the 
End of the Trail" he documents his 
findings. 







i J Mil «~T r. • -■>*. "' J* ^ ■ *— ' -!*^. - V~ " • 








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PERRYVILLE BATTLEFIELD 
MUSEUM 

On October 8, 1862, one of the 
bloodiest battles of the Civil War was 
fought near Perryville, Kentucky. 
Many of the homes at Perryville served 
as headquarters and hospitals during 
the battle. 

Although the Battle of Perryville 
lasted only from 2 p.m. until after dark, 
1822 Confederate and 4241 Union sol- 
diers were killed, wounded or missing 
in action. 

Two memorials now stand on the 
site, one erected in 1902, to the Con- 
federates, andone in 1931, to the Union 
soldiers who fell during the battle. 

In 1965, a museum was completed 
at Perryville Battlefield State Histori- 
cal Park. 

Perryville is located in the west- 
ern section of the beautiful Kentucky 
Bluegrass Region at the intersection of 
U.S. Highways 68 and 150. There are 
more than 30 buildings near the town 
that date back to the Civil War and each 
has its own significance in the story of 
the Battle of Perryville. 



LINCOLN LETTERS 

ON DISPLAY 

The following letter, written by 
Abraham Lincoln to his law partner, 
William^ Herndon, is in the outstanding 
collection of Lincoln Letters housed 
at the Illinois State Historical Library 
in Springfield, Illinois. 

Washington, July 11, 1848 

"Dear William: 

Yours of the 3rd is this moment 
received; and I hardly need to say, it 
gives unalloyed pleasure. I now almost 
regret writing the serious, long faced 
letter, I wrote yesterday; but let the 
past as nothing be. Go it while you're 
young! 

I write this in the confusion of 
the H. R.,and with several other things 
to attend to. I will send you about eight 
different speeches this evening; and as 
to kissing a pretty girl, (I) know one 
very pretty one, but I guess she wont 
let me kiss her. 

Yours forever 
A. Lincoln" 




Lincoln Heritage Trail Foundation 
216 South First Street 
Champaign, Illinois 61820 



/" 



. . 



........ ■■ i] 



\ 



"V» r ,„ 



Margarete G. Smith 
Cloverport Historian • 



— — j 

choo t " The A . be : la f *' 5 ub S? hfi 1 d by John H - Rurrott to Alexandria, Virginia, in 1861, is one of the rarest pieces of Lincoln 
sheet music to be found. The lyrics were written by J. P. McRebel and deal with the Baltimore assassination plot L 
allegedly wore a disguise as he passed through Baltimore, Maryland on his way to his inaugural in Washington D C 

This particular piece of Lincoln sheet music can be found at Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate' Tennessee ' 
There is also a copy m the Library of Congress. ^ ' ltJimebS » ee - ■ 



Abe Lincoln, was a citizen of very small 
renown, 

A railing abolitioner, of little Springfield 

town; 
Abe's party said, "November comes, now Abe, 

don't let us fail 
To meet the other parties all, and beat them 

with a rail ! ' 
November came, the rogues turned out, and 

yet, 'twas not allow 'd 
That Abe should come, lest Abram's face, 

should fright away the crowd! 

So Abram at his Springfield home, 

staid waiting for the news, 
The while, his party licked their 

chops, at smell of public stew; 
Soon hordes of every grade and 

shape, high, low, and ragged feller ! 
Came for each place, from chair of 

state, to toting Abe's umbreller! 
So Abram, left, and foolish speech, 

and maudlin kiss and shout 
Of flattering rabble, well composed, 

the triumph of his route. 

At length, a man full hard he ran — 

"A plot, a plot!" did yell, 
Then quick beneath each seat they 

sought infernal bursting shell; 
The man, they tried (and forth he 

lied) "The special train, " he said, 
"Will be upset, and if Abe 'scapes, 

arm'd men will shoot him dead!" 
Abe's friends a counter plot did hatch, 

'twas, "Run Abe Lincoln straight — 
For running was a strategem, of 

Bonaparte the Great!" 



Away went Abram, fast he flew! no 

judge that time could mark 
And dreading still, Grimalkin's corpse, 

or brick bats envious blow, 
At dead of night, he slyly passed thro' 

dreadful Baltimo"! 
So Abe stole into Washington (alas 

the woeful day) 
And fondly thought, poor foolish Abe! 

"Well four years here I'll stay!" 

Abe' human hopes are sandy ropes; 

to my advice give heed! 
And dearly prize those lengthly limbs, 

which give you wondrous speed! 
Repent and change! or as you came, 

soon darkly back you'll run; 
Aye ! day and night, with all your 

might, you'll run from sun to sun! 
Then let us say, make haste the day! 

and Abram, make haste he! 
And when old Abe, shall run that 

race, I may be there to see! 



********* 



********* 




"Is it unreasonable ... to expect that some man 
possessed of the liftiest genius, coupled with am- j 
bition sufficient to push it to its utmost stretch, 
will at some time spring up among us? And when 
such a one does, it will require the people to be united with 
each other, attached to the government and laws, and gen- 
erally intelligent, to successfully frustrate his designs. " 

Speech to Young Men's Lyceum 
January 27, 1838 
Springfield, Illinois 



At a County Court began raid held for Hardin County on Monday the 9th, day of 

August 1813. 

Present Nicholas Miller, Isom Enlow and Samuel Martin Esq. 

Ordered that Thomas Overall be and he is hereby appointed surveyor of that part 
of the road which lies between the red oak grove and Otter <$reek on the Hardins- 
burg road and that all the hands on Shaws Creek above Christopher Millers at John 
Pauls old place all the hands on George Howards old place end all the hands at the 
Widow Y'atts place and all other hands near said road and who are not included in 
the bounds of any other surveyor do assist said Overall in keeping said road in 
repair. 

Ordered that Court be adjourned till Court in Course. 



C. Miller 



A Oopy Attest R.N. Sprigg Clerk 
(Signed) 

Recorded Minute Book C 
Page 98 



i 



State of Kentucky 
County of Hardin. 

The affiants Hardin Douthitt and Dannie Douthitt beine duly sworn deposes 

and says that they have heaid their grandfather Drury Birch say that he was in 

Constantino, Breckinridge county, Kentucky when Thomas Lincoln came through 

there with his son Abo Lincoln, when on hi* way to Indiana* 

The affiant, Hardin Douthitt states that he heard his grandf ether say many 

times that he slept with the boy Abe Lincoln at Constant ine ay/ the home of 

a family by the name of Crumes. 

Witness ou* hands this November 7, 1929, his 

Hardin v Douthitt 

mark 
Fannie Douthitt 
Witness T» L. Williams 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this November 7, 1929, 

R. N. Sprigg C.H.C.C. 
By T. L. Williams D.C, 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, N. *J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINEvS 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 



With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Hudson, Ky. 
January 29, 1937. 



Affiant Ida LeGrand of Hudson, Ky. whose age is 55 years seys that she heard her 

grandfather, James Hudson say that Ahrahnm Lincoln with his father passed 

through Hudson enroute to Indiana by way of the William Crume farm l£ miles 

north of Hudson. She further says that she heard her grandmother tell about 

the William Crume family and they made it a stoppong place in passing through 

here. 

Witness my hand this 29th day of January 1930. 

Ida LeGrand 

Subscribed and sworn to before me a Notary Public by Ida LeGrand this 29th 
day of January 1930. 



Pete Bennett, N. P. 

Breckinridge county, Ky. 

My commission expires Tferoh 20, 1933. 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, "N. *J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY, 



"With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Hudson, Kentuoky , 
January 31, 1930. 

Affiant, ;dwrad Dodson of Hudson, Ky. Breckinridge county whose age is 
56 years, first being duly sworn says that his grandmother, .Jlizabeth Dodson 
told him that her parent Ralph Ilorseley and his wife who lived near "1111am 
Crume told her that Abe Lincoln with his parents on their way to Indiana 
came to William Crume* | and stayed all night, went somewhere across the country 
so see some relatives but dees not remember who it was, then came back to 
Crume* s and stayed all night* He further says that she said that they left 
the next day and camped the following night near where the Lost Run church now 
stands, came to Willaim Crune»s by way of Hu*son. He says his grand mother 
died at the age of 89 years and his great grandfather at the age of 90 years. 
this 31st day of January 1930. 

Edward Dodson. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me a Notary ^ublic by Edward Dodson this 
31st day of January 1930. 

Pete Bennett, N.* 7 . 

Breckinridge County, Ky. 

My commission expires I'erch 20, 1933. 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, N. J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY, 



"With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Affiant, Bettle Nottingham first being duly sworn deposes and says that she 
is 63 years of age, resides near Hudson, Ky. She further swears that her 
mother Martha E. Elliott who died fifteen years ago at the age of 87 — 
She further swears Jhat her raolher told her at different times that Thomas 
Lincoln as he moved from Hodgenville to Indiana that he came by the way of 
Hudson, Ky., add by -fee way of one William Crume f B and stayed with him two or 
three days* She further says she has heard this talk by the older people since 
childhood. She says that she was always told that the Crume family was related 
to the Thomas Lincolns. She says she has heard " illiam Crume and Angle, his 
wife say a number of times that they were related to the Lincoln family. 
Witness my hand this 19th day of January 1931. 



Bettle Nottingham 



County of Breckinridge, 
State of Koitucky. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me by Bettle Nottingham this 19th day of 
January 1931. 

Pete Bennett, Notary Public 

My commission expires Haroh 20, 1933 



\ \ 




KENTUCKY 



Mxmtm 

■■-■■'■■- - ,- -, W v W 



»«ho 







TENNESSEE 




THEHOKE-McMURTRY INS.AGY. 



ESTABLISHED 1910 

Elizabethtown. ky. 



Affiant Luther Dodson first being duly sworn deposes and says that he 
resides near Hudson, Ky. , that he is 38 years of age. He further swears 
that hie father told him that he heard different old people say that Thomas 
Lincoln and family enroute foom Hodgenville to Indiana oarae by the way of 
Hudson, Ky. from Hudson to Hardinsburg, stayed all night at William Crime's, 
then traveled the Hardinsburg road. Luther Dodson* s father died 8 years 
ago at tie ege of 72. 
Witness mu hand this 19th day of January 1931. 



Luther Dodson 



State of Kentucky 
County of Breckinridge. 



Subscribed and sworn to beibre a Notary Public by Luther Dodson. 
Witness my hand this 19th day of January 1931* 



Pete Bennett, N.P. 

My commission expires "arch 20, 1931 




The American Insurance Gompany 

Newark, N. J. 






FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 



With, everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Affiant R. C. Sharp first being duly sworn deposes and says he is 03 
years of age and resides in the coxmty of Breckinridge j State of Kentucky, 
near Fairfield, He further says that G. G. West who died 30 years ago 
at the age of 90 years, says 0. G, "est told him that Thonas Lincoln as he 

moved from Hodgenville to Indiana Hudson then to T 'ill4im Crume's 

1 £ miles north of Hudson and stayed all night. He also says IT. West 
told him that 1hqr were related to the Crumes. He has heard it talked by 
the old people from childhood. 
Witness my hand this 19th day of January 1931. 



R. 0* Sharp. 



County of Breckinridge 
State of Kentucky. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me a Notary Public by R. C. Sharp. 
Witness my hand this 19th day of January 1931. 



Pete Bennett, N.P. 
My commission expires 
Tferch 20, 1933. 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, "N. J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY, 



"With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Affiant J. H. Hagar first being duly sworn deposes and says that he is 
74 years old and resides near Fairfield, Ky. and further says ho hoard hia 
father-in-law G. B. Test say that Thomas Lincoln passed where he liyed 
enroute to Indiana, came through Constantino, Hudson, and stayed all night 
at William Crane 1 s lj miles north of Hudson, The said G. B. West died at 
the age of 89 years, being dead about 25 years, 
■itness my hand this 7th day of February 1930. 

J. H. Hager 

Attest Abe Bennett. 

State of Kentucky 
County of Breckinridge 



Subscribed and sworn to before me a Notary Public by J. H. Hager this 
7th day of February 1930. 



Pete Bennett, K tary Public 

Breckinridge county, Ky. 
My commission expires Harch 20, 1933. 




The American Insurance Gompany 

Newark, N. *J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY, 



With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 






^o*-^ _^_ -tJ^ ^^___^ u_^ 








tt^ c^, ^-w^ X-g ^jU) c^i) GL4- ouee tL* 

^ JU$l Z<* II 73. 



[ 



STATE OF KENTUCKY 
COUNTY OF BRECKINRIDGE 



I, J. T. Lucas, being duly sworn state that I am 63 years old and 
that I heard my uncle, Stephen Lucas say that his father said thut the 
Lincolas passed through Duncan^ Valley with a drove of cattle, and 
stayed all night on the farm now owned by mo, J. T. Lucas. 
And he further said that the Lincolns passed by way of the Vm. Crumes 
farm, the Lincoln being relatives of the Crumes, and that they swam the 
Ohio River with their cattle. I further state that he said his uncle, 
Stephen Lucas was 94 years old when he was telling him of the Lincolns 
coming through Duncan's Valley. 

Witness my hand this January 9th 1930. 

J. T. Lucas (Copy) 



STATE OF KENTUCKY 
COUNTY OF BRECKINRIDGE 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this January 1930. 



Pete Bennett, Notary Public 



Breckinridge Co., Ky. 

My commission expires March 20, 1933. 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, N. J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY, 



With everything AMERICAN, tomori'owis secure 



» 



I 



« 



STATE 0? KENTUCKY 
COUNTY OF BRECKINRIDGE 



I, «Y, H. Tucker, being duly Hwora atate that J. T. Bennett showed 
mc the trail that tho Thos. Lincoln family traveled on their way to 
Indiana, and that it ran through Iludaon to the flm Crune3 fam 1/2 miles north 
of Hudson, and that the Lincolns were relatod to the Cruroes, and that 
the said J. T. Bennett is 80 years old. 

Witness ray hand this 10th day of January 1930. 

W. H. Tuoker (copy) 



STATE OF KENTUCKY 
COUNTY OF BRECKINRIDGE 



Subscribed and sworn to before a Notary Public, for the county and 
State aforesaid. 



Pete Bennett, Notary "libllo 

Breckinridge Co. Ky. 
I!y coiiraission expires T'arch 30, 1933. 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, N. J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 



With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



STATS OF K2KTU0K¥ 
COUNTY" OF BR3CKDJSIDG-E 



I, J» A* oiggins, being duly sworn state that I em 61 years old, 
and T.faile driving with ray father in a buggy on the Old State Road, Just north of 
Hudson, Ky. wy father told me that this was the oldest road in this part 
of Breckinridge county and that it was a part of the Lincoln Trail, and that 
the Lincolns visited a family by the name of Grumes, to whom the Lincolns 
were related. This Crumes family lived about 1 1/2 miles north of 
HudBon, Ky. My father told me this about 45 years ago. My father 
Edward Quiggins was a soldier of the Civil War, and knew Abe Lincoln. 



Witness my hand this January 9, 1930* 

J. A. Quiggins 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this January 9, 1930. 



Pete Bennett, Notary Public 

Breckinridge county, Ky. 
My commission expires March 20, 1933. 




The American Insurance Gompany 

Newark, "N. *J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 



"With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow- is secure 



Book B. Page 223 
SOrdered that John Chaff in bo and he In hereby appointed surveyor of the road 



ceding from Eli7.abethtown to Spriiigfield vhich lios between Eliaabethtrim 
and tfefl line between vin. VTodlcys and Andrew* Pairley, in place of Androw Fairlcy, 
and that all the hands that lid assist said Pairley, cio assist the said Chaffin 
in keeping said road in repair*** 



Date of Above 1808 



The above is en exact copy of the original 



(Signed) R.N, Sprigg Clerk 
Hardin County Court. 



I 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, N. *J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY, 



With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Book B. Page 356 

■ Ordered that Thomas Beard be and he is hereby appointed surveyor of that part 
of the road leading from Elizabethtown to Springfield, which lies between Mills 
Ferry and the forks of the road about haltf a mile from the foot of the big hill, 
An place of Thomas Hargis, and that all the hands that did assist said Hargis, do 
assist said Beard in keeping said road in repeir". 

Date of above 1809 

The above is a true copy of the original on record 



(Signed) R.N. Sprigg Clerk 
Hardin County Court 



(Search made by John 0. Walker) 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, N. «J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 



"With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Book A Page 86 

■ Ordered that- Nicholas Miller be appointed, oversoer of tho road in the room 
of Jacob Rhoades, and the.t tho ^mo titha-lss that assisted hin, do assist the 
said Killer in keeping said road in Vtptir to the foot of the Die hill, and thai 
said road be e^t«"ded to the Boiling Pork" 

7)ate of above 1796 

The above is a ture copy of a portion of the original order. 

(Signed) R.N. Sprigg Clerk 
Hardin County Court 




The American Insurance Gompariy 

Newark, "N. *J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 



"With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Book A. Fage 418 



■ Order d that Fetor Atherton bo and he in hereby appintcd surveyor of the road 
leading from the big hill to the Rolling Fori: in the room of Honry Dewitt, and it 
la further ordered that the erne haadl do assist hlia in keeping the same in repair 
that assisted the same Dewitt ,f . 



Dated September 1803 



The above is an exact oory of the Original. 



(Signed) R.N. Sprlgg 
Clerk Hardin Co. Ct. 




The American Insurance Gompany 



Newark, N. *J. 



FIRE INSURANCE AND KINDRED LINES 



HOKE-McMURTRY INSURANCE AGENCY 

Established 1910 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 



With everything AMERICAN, tomorrow is secure 



Famous Men 
Who Visited Cloverport 



Touching the soil of 
Cloverport were famous 
men as Henry Clay, who 
was entertained in the 
home of Colonial David R. 
Murray in 1800's, young 
Abraham Lincoln spent 
the night in Joeville in log 
cabin near the home of 
late Edward Bowne with 
his family in 1816 enroute 
to his new home in 
Indiana; David Crockett, a 
school boy idol stopped at 
mOuth of Clover Creek, 
enroute to Texas, on flat 
boat and made a speech 
pleading his cause; General 
La Fayette shipwrecked 
on island near Cloverport 
when he reached Joeville 
barefooted took his turn 
in loading fuel wood from 
the wood yard to the 
Steamer Paragon enroute 
to Louisville. President 
Franklin Roosevelt spent 
10* minutes at the depot 
during a lay over at the 
L&N RR depot and spoke 
briefly to the soldiers who 
were guarding the tracks, 
this was during World War 
II; William. J. Bryan, 
famous orator made an 
eloquent speech also at the 
L&N RR depot during his 
campaign in the early 
1900's. ..;.._ ■,; 

.Being a river town, 
Cloverport has the 
distinction of producing 



two steam boat Captains: 
Captain J. M. White of the 
famous luxury steam boat 
"The J. M. White" and 
Captain Marion Ryan, 
Captain of Cloverport's 
best loved steam boat 
"The City of Owensboro." 
Both Captains are buried 
in the Cloverport 
Cemetery. Tradition has it 
that one was buried in an 
upright position. His 
monument on top of 
Cemetery Hill facing the 
West bend of the Ohio has 
the likeness of two steam 
boat smoke stacks. The 
standing position is 
traditional of all river boat 
captains, "Hands on the 
wheel— Eyes upon the 
Bend." 

By Margarete G. Smith 
Cloverport, Kentucky 







(.JAniu^c'il -^^i: 



' - • - • -■.•'.-.'-.'■- - : " i - ; 

Lincoln Heritage Trail Foundation 

702 Bloomington Road 

Champaign, Illinois 61820 

• :■. 

• ■ 



. 



A Margarete G. Smith j 
;] Cloverport Historian ' 
^Cloverport, Ky. 40111' 



-. " '. 



■ ■ .. ^i-.u*.'.'-*-**-- 



Meade County Rural Electric 



% DiLJL^ ite^tLEzLun 




ELIZABETHTOWN 







HODGENVIJLLE 



* 



HARNED 

HARDINSBURG 



CLOVERPORT 



CANNELTON^&\ 

TELL CITY - I j 
TROY - 9 



LINCOLN FAMILY TRAIL 
MARKER AT CLOVERPORT, KY. 

Just where did the Thomas Lincoln 
family cross the Ohio River when they 
left Knob Creek farm to make a new 
home in Spencer County, Ind. ? 

Historians have long disagreed on 
their exact route, but residents of 
Cloverport, Ky. , "know for certain" 
that the crossing took place at Clover- 
port. And the Kentucky Historical 
Society, after much research, agreed 
with them. Upon the Society's recom- 
mendation, inl954anofficial historical 
marker was placed near Cloverport 
marking the site of the crossing. 

According to an article written in 
i 1956 by Joe Creason for the Louisville 
| Courier -Journal, "Not an awful lot of 
1 concrete evidence exists as to the route 
over which, or even the exact day when, 
1 the Lincolns left Kentucky. . . 

The best evidence indicates that 
] the Lincolns spent their first night on 
', the road with relatives at Mill Creek, J 
| a tiny settlement which long since has | 
t been swallowed up inside the sprawling 
| Fort Knox military reservation. From 
j there, they inched on through Elizabeth- 
town, past Fisher, Big Spring and 
Hardinsburg in a northwesterly direc- 
tion and finally came to a ferry crossing 
somewhere on the Ohio River. 

Experts long have disagreed vio- 
lently as to just where the ferry was 
located. But most seem to feel it was 
at or near Joeville, now Cloverport. 
To say the least, it is definite that a 
road — and there weren't too many in 
those days--led from Elizabethtown to 
Joeville, where a licensed ferry had 
been operating since 1802". 

Margaret fk Smith, Cloverport 
historian, now leads the effort to gain 
recognition for the part the town played 
in the historic Lincoln journey from 
Kentucky to Indiana . She is the daughter 
of the late Edward Gregory, who pio- 



neered research on the route back in 
the 1930's. In his booklet, "At the 
End of the Trail" he documents his 
findings. 



i